Pat Coleby Diet

MYTEE4EVA

Active Member
I'm interested to know who uses Pat Coleby's Diets.
Is it a balanced diet?
What results have you seen?
 

retroremedy

Well-known Member
There are 2 types of horse people in the world....those that think Pat Colby ideas are brilliant and those that think the ideas are insane :) The reason for this is the concept of "balanced diet" that you have mentioned. When it comes to recommended daily intake (RDI's) Pat Colby is from another planet because if you are interested in feeding your horse to accepted RDI's of various dietary components then the Pat Colby diet is not for you :)
 

MYTEE4EVA

Active Member
Or if people use these what would be the RDI be?
I'm curious to know as I have seen people adding these "maybe not all" to their horses feeds.
 

beagle

Well-known Member
I've never read one of Pat's books, so can't really comment on the content, but I have the opinion that most horse owners here in WA at least find the recommendations a bit too "out there".
We really need to take into consideration our own soil types, climate, working conditions & exercise levels, then factor in the breed specific requirements.
A while ago, someone posted a link to "Feeding Horses in Western Australia", can't recall the publisher, it might have been Ag Dept or CSIRO, but I downloaded it (40 odd pages i think!!!!) & it seems to fit well considering we have such a diverse soil type. Agriculture in WA, as broad-acre farming at it's best, does soil/tissue typing & thus caters fertilisers & trace-element/mineral applications to individual areas. Thus the uptake by plants for hay,fodder & seed respond adequately, & in consequence will have different levels of nutrients to pastures/hay/grains that have not been taken from tested paddocks.
I personally have the opinion that horses don't necessarily go for the ad lib mins that they "require" - it's a bit broad to ascertain that. After all, they eat certain shit that they shouldn't.....lead rope anyone???
Likewise, I know chocolate isn't good for me in such quantities, but I still eat it.:)
 
A

Anna E

Guest
Dolomite is a poor source of both calcium and magnesium - more bang from your buck from calcium carbonate and magnesium oxide. But actual deficiency of either is rare unless your horse is grazing a pure stand of kikuyu or some of the sub tropical grasses.
Sulphur - most diets contain adequate sulphur without adding organic sulphur.
Seaweed - added at the rates she recommends would result in a diet too high in iodine which is a potential risk for long term toxicity
Copper - I'm not going to even go there... suffice to say that it's good job horses are quite tolerant of excess copper.... the doses recommended by Pat Coleby IMHO are WAY too high.
I do add ACV to my horse's feeds... I'm never quite sure why! :eek:
ETA: cross posting Beagle! Like your post a LOT. I base the supplements I give to my horses on what I know to be our soil deficiencies. Even within WA the issues on the Swan Coastal plain are quite different to those in the Wheatbelt or down in Albany.
As for "nutritional wisdom" I find my horses only seem to go for salt when given things free choice.. And if that theory holds true there's something really good for them in pine round yard poles!
Care to PM me the link you mentioned? ;)
 
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beagle

Well-known Member
I like enrgy gold from kohnke's, Anna - cos it has the smell of a pizza shop!!!!!
 

MYTEE4EVA

Active Member
I personally haven't read Pat Coleby's books, have only read some material on other forums that have discussed her methods. Then noticed that I had seen people adding some of these additives to their horses feeds so was wondering what the benefits were of adding the above mentioned additives, obviously here in WA we don't give the quanties that she recommends. You girls lost me with all the soil talk unfortunately. It's obviously what the PC diet is based on though poor quality pastures else where.
 

LittleTM

New Member
I personally haven't read Pat Coleby's books, have only read some material on other forums that have discussed her methods. Then noticed that I had seen people adding some of these additives to their horses feeds so was wondering what the benefits were of adding the above mentioned additives, obviously here in WA we don't give the quanties that she recommends. You girls lost me with all the soil talk unfortunately. It's obviously what the PC diet is based on though poor quality pastures else where.
This is exactly what her diet is based on... getting the nutrients unlocked in the soil so it flows into the foliage and thereby is accessible to animals. the ad lib nutrients is to rectify any deficincies in the soil while you are getting the soil right. This is the first part of the diet- if the soil is right you don't have to do anything else. I have been to a talk by her and she is a tough wiry old bird... used to be very much into dressage.
 

Debra Watson

New Member
I'm interested to know who uses Pat Coleby's Diets.
Is it a balanced diet?
What results have you seen?
I have used Pat Colbys diet with great success over the years, it is especially good for improved hoof health... and if you read her book thoroughly you will find that your horse uses feed far more efficiently if they are getting their essential minerals either through pasture or in supplementation... I had stopped using her mineral supplementation because it takes more effort to source the minerals and premix them etc... and started using high dollar ready made feeds and supplements without great success and a huge financial outlay including vet bills as a result so I am now returning to her simpler less expensive form of feeding...but you must read her book carefully to understand it fully dont just take other peoples word for it. It is very well researched and supported by research.....About the copper sulphate use, read her section on copper and read her references and you will find that most modern supplements and feeds are deficient in this essential mineral, and it is the cause of many common problems with horses these days along with sulphur deficiency....
My horses have recently had an out break of ring worm, itch and seedy toe all indicative of a copper deficiency despite feeding them high dollar feeds and so call all purpose supplements! So I am going back to the basics.....to Pat Colbys formula because it works!
 

Debra Watson

New Member
Dolomite is a poor source of both calcium and magnesium - more bang from your buck from calcium carbonate and magnesium oxide. But actual deficiency of either is rare unless your horse is grazing a pure stand of kikuyu or some of the sub tropical grasses.
Sulphur - most diets contain adequate sulphur without adding organic sulphur.
Seaweed - added at the rates she recommends would result in a diet too high in iodine which is a potential risk for long term toxicity
Copper - I'm not going to even go there... suffice to say that it's good job horses are quite tolerant of excess copper.... the doses recommended by Pat Coleby IMHO are WAY too high.
I do add ACV to my horse's feeds... I'm never quite sure why! :eek:
ETA: cross posting Beagle! Like your post a LOT. I base the supplements I give to my horses on what I know to be our soil deficiencies. Even within WA the issues on the Swan Coastal plain are quite different to those in the Wheatbelt or down in Albany.
As for "nutritional wisdom" I find my horses only seem to go for salt when given things free choice.. And if that theory holds true there's something really good for them in pine round yard poles!
Care to PM me the link you mentioned? ;)

Unless you have read her book entirely and referred to her research and supporting documentation you really cannot make these assumptions....her whole point at the start of her book is to base your mineral supplementation based on your property or pasture or feed deficiencies (not your horse?) the assumption being if they are being fed deficient feed/pasture they will also be deficient in these minerals and she gives a general guide to the best and easiest and most natural form of supplementation to use. Also another important point she makes is if your horses are getting the correct minerals they will use their feed far more efficiently and hence need to eat less rather creating very expensive manure with premixed feeds and supplements...
But every area is different so you cant just use a blanket formula. In my area where I keep my horses (SEQld, Australia) it was spot on, after I looked at our soil sample analysis, and her formula worked perfectly for our soil and pasture type and I rarely had any of the common problems that horses normally had in our area, Queensland itch and hoof problems such as seedy toe are normally very common, but because of our horse being fed the 'high' dose of copper which was diluted in their water hence the sulphate form and used to damp down their feed as per her recommendation and we never had any problems with toxicity; quite the opposite in fact. They were all very healthy shiny coats and feet rock hard....even our farrier started using our supplementation as he could not believe the difference the diet was making to their hooves.

She also advises to have the salt and seaweed meal available 'adlib' free choice but it must be under cover (if it gets wet it get toxic)....I found our horses will gorge on it for the first few weeks but then when they are topped up they are quit eating it, its a great natural source of biotin and essential trace minerals....be wary about feeding it on a daily basis as that can cause problems....they only should be fed it if they need it.... currently I am feeding it free choice to my yearlings and two year olds and I cannot keep up with it....whereas most of my older horses barely touch it...

Small Mineral supplement containers are not so easy to find in Oz but are readily available in the US....I get them at Tractor supply and each horse has one either attached to their feed bin or next to is on their stall wall. Outside horses have access to it in their run in shelters.

Obviously if you have healthy remineralised soil and pasture you will not need these mineral supplements....and that is my aim....but that doesnt happen easily and even then if you buy in hay you dont know if it has been grown in proper remineralised soil or just poor soil using artificial fertilisers....who has the time and money to get their hay tested each batch?
 

Debra Watson

New Member
So adding copper sulphate, copper sulfer, dolomite, seaweed and ACV or oil is a no no?
I suggest reading her book first in its entirety and looking at her sources/references before making your decision....get your soil or feed/hay tested first before you decide what you need to supplement....
 
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