Hendra outbreak

Sugar's Mum

Gold Member
taken from nine msn
Hendra outbreak confirmed in far north Qld
6:30pm November 3, 2012

Four people had come into contact with a horse put down after being confirmed as having Hendra virus, authorities in Queensland say.

Test results on Friday night confirmed the latest case - the eighth Hendra virus incident in Queensland this year and the second in Ingham, north of Townsville.

The horse was euthanased on a far north Queensland property this week.

Queensland Health said on Saturday that three of the four people have been assessed and found to have a very low level risk of infection.

The fourth person identified as having been in contact with the animal is yet to be assessed.

Queensland Chief Veterinary Officer Dr Rick Symons said the horse was first noticed to be sick by its owner on Wednesday afternoon.

Dr Symons said a private veterinarian treated the horse as a potential Hendra virus case due to the sudden onset of neurological signs, lethargy and lack of appetite.

By Thursday afternoon, the horse's condition had deteriorated and a decision was made to euthanase it.

"Biosecurity Queensland officers were on site this morning and have quarantined the property," Dr Symons said in a statement on Saturday.

"They will also undertake tracing as a priority to assess whether any other animals were at risk of being exposed to the virus.

"Restrictions apply to moving horses and horse materials on and off the infected property, and the property will be quarantined for at least one month."

Queensland Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young reassured the community that transmission of the virus required close contact with bodily fluids of an infected horse.

This year there have been Hendra cases in Townsville, Cairns, Ingham, Mackay, Port Douglas and Rockhampton.

All of the other quarantines have been lifted.
 

Sugar's Mum

Gold Member
Three dogs and eight horses are being tested for Hendra after an outbreak of the deadly virus in north Queensland.

A property in Ingham, north of Townsville, remains quarantined after a horse tested positive to the virus on Friday. It has since been put down.

Eight horses and three dogs are now undergoing blood tests.

A Biosecurity Queensland spokesman told AAP on Sunday the tests were a precaution and none of the animals were showing any Hendra symptoms.

He said it was routine for dogs that had come into contact with infected horse to be tested.

Last year, a dog tested positive to Hendra for the first time and had to be put down.

Four people have been identified as having a very low risk of infection in the latest outbreak.

Queensland Health says all four, including the horse owner and family, have opted to not undergo tests.

It is Queensland's eighth Hendra case this year and Ingham's second.

Since Hendra was first identified in Brisbane in 1994, four people have died, along with more than 80 horses.

Scientists rolled out the first Hendra vaccine for horses last week.
 

EVP

Gold Member
I find it absolutely frightening that the disease, known to be transferred to dogs, is again a very local concern. I know 'we' have labelled this bat disease as Hendra, but in my head I am calling it 'rabies'.....I can't be convinced that the differences in the two are big enough to put alot of thought into it, and I'm of the opinion if it sounds like a duck, walks like a duck, then I know its not an elephant.....lolol. So call me stupid but *quack*.
 

mirawee

Gold Member
Given it has a different method of being passed on and different animals can be affected I am not sure how it could be considered rabies? Yes a dog has tested positive but there is no evidence that a dog can even pass it on.

It is pretty well the same as Nipah virus though except for infecting horses rather than pigs...
 

EVP

Gold Member
Given it has a different method of being passed on and different animals can be affected I am not sure how it could be considered rabies? Yes a dog has tested positive but there is no evidence that a dog can even pass it on.

It is pretty well the same as Nipah virus though except for infecting horses rather than pigs...

Yes I know its NOT rabies, but.....lyssavirus, nipah, hendra, rabies, ect ect......different countries and all that stuff.....but maybe I have a very active imagination when it comes to 'mutation'.
 

mirawee

Gold Member
How similar are the symptoms though between Hendra and Rabies? I know they are similar between Nipah and Hendra but hadn't heard any comparisons between Rabies before.

I guess I could do my own research but it is simplier to ask :p
 

EVP

Gold Member
How similar are the symptoms though between Hendra and Rabies? I know they are similar between Nipah and Hendra but hadn't heard any comparisons between Rabies before.

I guess I could do my own research but it is simplier to ask :p

Hendra & Nipah are very similiar. Nipah can be transmitted human to human and that link with Hendra hasn't been established. But Hendra research hasn't been going on that long and has only worked with limited infected subjects?

In Arizona USA the most common carrier of Rabies is the bat, then the fox and skunk. Strange then that skunks and foxes are carnivores - who are likely to eat bats.

There is a book called "Spillover".....am going to get it and read it over Xmas!

All these diseases that cross species...apes to humans, horses to humans, pigs and birds to humans....very scary stuff. To me bats are the rats of the sky and I cannot understand their stringent protection status.
People have died just from breathing in cave air where bats live and poop!!!
 

Sugar's Mum

Gold Member
you would be very intersted to read a book I read about mad cow disease then EVP. It was written by one of the researchers who tracked it between humans/cows and sheep. I think he might have been the discoverer of the prions.

It was a seriously scary book, well worth reading. I read it around 2000/2001 and he was predicting a huge spike in dementia in England around now from the injestion of prions.

Another one also very worth reading was a book titled white death in black africa about the spread of HIV and AIDS and the potential source of HIV.

Those two books made me realise how amazing are the scientists who study these very scary diseases.

Nothing at all to do with the Hendra disease but fascinating reading.
 

Meischa

New Member
EVP - I have Spillover and would be happy to give it to you to read if you don't already have the book. It was given to all of us that attended a Hendra Virus information night at our local vets.

The Hendra vaccination was made available on 1st November for those of us in Qld and Northern NSW.

As yet it is not been tested on breeding stock (pregnant mares and stallions) nor on horses that have diseases like Cushings etc. It will be approx 3 months before that sort of information is available. They also don't know how long the cover lasts (6 or 12 months) at this stage and there's no blood test (again, YET) to determine if the animal has taken up coverage. Horses to be exported can not yet have the vaccination as the blood test at this stage just looks like the horse has had the virus and many countries now demand this test before taking an Australian animal.

The vet had another information night about the vaccination and the facts are rather sobering.

The vaccination is given (by a vet ONLY), the horse is micro-chipped and then EXACTLY 21 days later (can't be 20 nor can it be 22) they are given a booster. A quick health check is done first. The vet has 48 hours to get all details about animal and owner to the Government website or the vaccination is null and void.

The cost is pretty prohibitive. Our local vet had prices of $185 per injection for one horse, reducing down to $135 for four horses or more. If you can arrange 20+ horses (eg Pony Club) the cost went down to $110 per horse per injection. Micro-chip $11. I've seen some costs of $49.50 for micro-chip, plus travel, plus $190+ per injection.

Basically, those of us that took up vaccinating our horses are part of a clinical trial (or that's how I see it) but it all has to start somewhere. We'd still have people dying of small-pox and polio etc if people didn't take a risk in the beginning.

Just thought some of you might be interested :)
 

Meischa

New Member
Thanks Sugar's Mum

I should also have said that the vaccination is not to cover our horses it is to protect humans (according to the vet information night). Horses are the link between the bats (and there's now argument that it's not bats) and humans.

Personally, I vaccinated my girls to protect them.

Hendra is 100% fatal in horses because even if they do recover they are PTS in case they shed the virus at a later stage, which is also why the one dog was PTS (in case he shedded the virus at a later date).

70% fatality rate in humans. All deaths are males.
 

Ponies4Me

Well-known Member
Prices for vaccination are all over the place. I paid $108 per shot per horse. Friend has just paid $75 per shot, the cheapest that I'd heard of til then was $96. Winner of the highest so far, that I know of *drum roll for this* quoted for FIRST SHOT ONLY for two horses was $800, plus travel. Bet theres a rush there - not.
 

Meischa

New Member
Prices for vaccination are all over the place. I paid $108 per shot per horse. Friend has just paid $75 per shot, the cheapest that I'd heard of til then was $96. Winner of the highest so far, that I know of *drum roll for this* quoted for FIRST SHOT ONLY for two horses was $800, plus travel. Bet theres a rush there - not.

OMG $800 plus travel for the first injection :eek: Oh yeah, I can see owners rushing to get their horses done at that price. NOT :mad:

Wow $75 is excellent :)
 

Sugar's Mum

Gold Member
from ninemsn this morning


Hendra virus found in SA flying foxes
12:25pm January 18, 2013



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Hendra virus has been detected in flying foxes in Adelaide for the first time.


The virus was found in a tissue sample taken from flying foxes that died during extreme temperatures earlier this month.

About 100 of the animals were found dead in the North Adelaide parklands with heat stress the likely cause.

South Australia's chief veterinary officer Rob Rahaley said people should be alert but not alarmed by the discovery.

He said while the virus could be transmitted to horses some simple precautions could be taken by horse owners to minimise the risk.

"While this is the first time Hendra virus has been found in bats in SA, it was expected, as our flying fox population most likely originated from Victoria and New South Wales, where evidence of Hendra virus infection in flying foxes was demonstrated some time ago," Dr Rahaley said.

"It has always been assumed local flying foxes would have a similar status to animals in those states.

"However we believe local factors such as vegetation and climate mean the risk to South Australian horses is much lower than it is in Queensland and northern NSW."

Dr Rahaley said the Hendra virus had never been detected in a horse in SA, Victoria or southern NSW.

"But the discovery serves as a reminder to all South Australian horse owners to take steps to minimise the potential for contact between flying foxes and horses.

"Owners should prevent their horses being near fruiting and flowering trees that flying foxes may frequent and cover feed bins and troughs."

Hendra virus is also a rare but serious and sometimes fatal disease in people.

But all known cases have been acquired from contact with infected horses and there have been no reports of people being infected directly from flying foxes.
 

Ponies4Me

Well-known Member
Apologies for sounding like a broken record...but there is info galore on www.hendraawareness.com.au including maps of Aus where flying foxes are found and info re areas where bats have tested positive to HeV.

Interesting comments re the weather and conditions considering the difference in same between FNQ in summer and Northern NSW in winter, both of which have had confirmed cases at those times of year.
 
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