Equilibrium!

L

lhuband

Guest
Hi guys.
i recently bought a bag of Equilibrium and my horse doesnt like it i started with small amount to build uo to recommended levels and she left it still
even with Molasses or dampened a little she leaves it in the bottom of her feed bin.
ive now cut it right back to less than 1/2 recommended dose

Any ideas on what to do? the bag was $100
a years worth for 1 horse
 

Boo's Eclipse

Well-known Member
Are you talking about the mineral mix, or the cool mix?

I use the mineral mix, my horses eat it with wet copra (don't think they even know it's there)
 

WITCHERY

Well-known Member
I don't use it either!

but my mineral mix that i use the horses didn't like for a while now they lick it up, go figure
 

Animosity

Well-known Member
My horse didint like it either, she wouldnt touch her fed with it in it. i have swapped to Livamol, she seems to like it :)
 

pso

Gold Member
Well, it doesnt contain very high levels of vits essential for WA conditions (eg calcium to balance oxalate pasture, selenium...)

heres a breakdown of what is in it, with a comparison to a well known WA made product... of course Equilibrium has salts added too...so they are different products...But the essential minerals are quite different in composition;) Maybe you feed 4x as much equilibrium tho? (not sure of daily dose)


Equilibrium /kg (WA product /kg)
Calcium 127 g (300gm)
Phosphorus 88 g (60gm)
Manganese 596 mg (2000mg)
Cobalt 4 mg (17mg)
Selenium 8 mg (25mg)
Iodine 4 mg (17mg)
Vitamin A 250,000 IU (400,000IU)
Vitamin E 1250 mg (10,000mg)
Copper 945 mg (1700mg)
Zinc 2020 mg (5000mg)
Folic Acid 100 mg (250mg)
Sodium 107 g
Magnesium 47 g
Potassium 38 gm
Chloride 139 g
Iron (ferrous) 2792 mg
Sulphur 7.4 g
Vitamin B1 300 mg
Chromium (40mg)
Biotin (17mg)


Just had a look...for a horse...You feed 210gms per day of equilibrium, compared to 60gms of the WA product...
And the same quantity of the WA product costs 25% less...hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
but the min levels are therefore not as bad as I thought they were...but the RATIO's are certainly different! ;) :p
 
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Rem

Well-known Member
I won't use it either, there is a locally made vit/mineral supplement that is much better.
 

Horsetalk

Well-known Member
It's always best to get a small quantity of a new vitamin and mineral supplement to see, if the horse likes it or shifts it out. WA made is best, if you are in WA, saves you transport costs as well. :)
 

Mouse

Well-known Member
I have managed to get hold of it again. I did switch to the WA product but my mares coats were very average and was not pleased with the way they were. After a couple of weeks of swapping back there has been a huge improvement.
 

Shmoo

Well-known Member
For the majority of horses that live on the coastal strip from Bunbury to Cervantes there is more then enough calcium in the soils as there is a limestone shelf not far under the surface of the top soil.
To be realistic there is not one vit/min supplement that can do any specific area anywhere in WA (or OZ for that matter) without other regions missing out, that is the nature of the land.
So it is probebly best just to use an all round balanced supplement with roughage, or stick to recommended rations of premixed feeds with roughage which are formulated for every horses min. daily requirements or...... if you can get your soils tested (in various areas of your property for an average) weigh all your feeds everyday and get those tested etc. etc. and be clever enough to mix your own then, you could do that too.:D
 

Troppo

Well-known Member
Cheers Schmoo, I totally agree,

Exactly what I was thinking! The nature of different soil types, different pastures, different mineral compositions of soils (and believe me I have had it up to here with this stuff as it is what I am currently studying and working on!) Means that there cannot be any one supplement which will contribute to an entire state's (or entire perth region for that matter) mineral requirements. For example,p the mineral composition of the soils in the laterite outcrops of the Darling Scarp will be completely different to the composition of the sandy soils of the Coastal Plain such as the Bassendean Grey's as, as well as differing from the loamy areas of the agricultural/vineyard regions of the Swan valley. The mineral uptake will also depend on the type of pasture and the way that pasture utilises and stores this mineral content. Way too complicated for any one product to cater for! The only way to know fully whether your horse is getting its daily total mineral requirements is as Schmoo suggested, but unless you horses are top athletes in high level competitrion, I don't see the point or the expense.

I can guarantee I don't get my daily requirement of every single mineral and I operate just fine (but I am certainly not in any form of high level competition). However I know that I live in a hot, humid sweaty are, and make a point of drinking electrolytes (as I also feed to my horses).

There are many good products on the market, and I know many people on here have used Equilibrium with much success - each to their own I say. But Equilibrium, as well as product's like the John Kohnke range, Equi-Min and others have all proved to serve their purpose as an all round mineral supplement.

And so concludes today's science lesson.......:p
 

LyndaA

New Member
See if someone will buy it off you-no point feeding it if they won't eat it. I have used it with no drama's but have swapped to VitaFit now-locally made in WA by a well know horse women :)
 

chance18

New Member
I would have to totally agree with both Shmoo & Troppo - feeding of horses is a very complicated subject (after studying for 3 years to get a uni degree in horses that included equine nutrition it is amazing how complicated it actually is!!) & for your horse to have a balanced diet that ensures that all requirements are met for that particular horse, every aspect needs to be taken into consideration, for example -
  • the pasture - its species, stage of growth, what soil type it is grown on & the soil profile (which can greatly vary!) etc
  • the roughage (e.g. chaff) - its weight, type, the quality of the soil that the crop was grown in (this is the same for hay as well!!!)
  • the concentrates fed - their weight, composition & the specifics of the particular crop (crops grown in different areas on different soils will vary)
  • any supplements - their composition & what part of the diet that is lacking that they are trying to balance out...

    and..... other things more specific to the horse need to be taken into consideration, such as....

  • the amount & type of work it is doing (different work requirements require different food sources so the horse can fully utilise the nutrients, e.g. endurance vs TB racing)
  • the horse's weight & body condition & if these factors need to be increased or decreased ......

    the list goes on & on & on!!!! this is why we have trained nutritionists & nutrition advisors who understand the science of it & who have access to complicated feeding programs whose job it is to help us navigate this mine field & do what's best for the horse!!!!
just a bit of 'food' for thought!!!!! :) :)
 

citygirl

Gold Member
For the majority of horses that live on the coastal strip from Bunbury to Cervantes there is more then enough calcium in the soils as there is a limestone shelf not far under the surface of the top soil.
.:D

By the "Coastal Stip" you do mean from the Darling Rangers to the ocean ? if so, than IMO I disagree with you....

In my area the predominant grass in grazing paddocks for livestock-Horses is KIKUYU.

"many pasture grasses are high in phosphorus and contain oxalates, {bran contains phytates}. Phytates
and oxalates bind calcium - preventing absorption. Oxalates are present in kikuyu, buffel grass, pangola,
green panic and setaria. Horses on these feeds may require up to 100 grams of extra calcium per day "

**)

Cheers
Lee
 

Shmoo

Well-known Member
By the "Coastal Stip" you do mean from the Darling Rangers to the ocean ? if so, than IMO I disagree with you....

In my area the predominant grass in grazing paddocks for livestock-Horses is KIKUYU.

Precisely my point, vit/min supplements are marketed to "soil type" which has no baring on what is grown in the soil anywhere in Australia though not just the area I mentioned.
There are improved pastures for high density horse keeping "parking lots" that are predominately Oxalate pastures as they are traditionally able to handle the damage horses do to them while still "looking" reasonable while giving the animals something to do (nibbling pick) and rarely would it be the staple diet, in which case if the horses were on pure oxalate pasture - enough to sustain a horse on it's own - I would certainly test what the horse is getting to give the horse a closer ideal balance. (Same would go for those horses grazing on Lucerne as a staple which has too much calcium in relation to phosphorous.)
Larger landholdings in the area though also consist of Rye, Lotus, Clovers and other legumes and grasses that are not oxalate pastures where you would not have to worry about the binding effects oxalate pastures would have on calcium uptake esp. in those areas over limestone. But it's not just about calcium, there are many other variables with other vit/mins in a horses diet, it was just an example as calcium was brought up earlier and would get far too complicated and we would all need a degree to understand it.;)

So, I still stand by what I said, stick with a general vit/min supplement or complete feed, so the basic min. daily amounts are reached. If your worried about imbalances in your area by all means get your pasture and soils tested and you will have more idea where the base of your horses diet would start.:))
 
L

lhuband

Guest
Cheers Schmoo, I totally agree,

Exactly what I was thinking! The nature of different soil types, different pastures, different mineral compositions of soils (and believe me I have had it up to here with this stuff as it is what I am currently studying and working on!) Means that there cannot be any one supplement which will contribute to an entire state's (or entire perth region for that matter) mineral requirements. For example,p the mineral composition of the soils in the laterite outcrops of the Darling Scarp will be completely different to the composition of the sandy soils of the Coastal Plain such as the Bassendean Grey's as, as well as differing from the loamy areas of the agricultural/vineyard regions of the Swan valley. The mineral uptake will also depend on the type of pasture and the way that pasture utilises and stores this mineral content. Way too complicated for any one product to cater for! The only way to know fully whether your horse is getting its daily total mineral requirements is as Schmoo suggested, but unless you horses are top athletes in high level competitrion, I don't see the point or the expense.

I can guarantee I don't get my daily requirement of every single mineral and I operate just fine (but I am certainly not in any form of high level competition). However I know that I live in a hot, humid sweaty are, and make a point of drinking electrolytes (as I also feed to my horses).

There are many good products on the market, and I know many people on here have used Equilibrium with much success - each to their own I say. But Equilibrium, as well as product's like the John Kohnke range, Equi-Min and others have all proved to serve their purpose as an all round mineral supplement.

And so concludes today's science lesson.......:p

cant tell someone has a degree in science land stuff! hehe
 

Wendy

Well-known Member
Locally made product

Would someone care to PM me with the name of this "locally made product" as my feedman didn't know of it, saying there were hundreds of similar products.
For the scientists - how would the Pat Coleby paddock mix compare?

.
 
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