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why do ppl dislike standardbreds so much?

Horse Riding Thread, why do ppl dislike standardbreds so much? in Horses and Ponies; Originally Posted by Heifer The horse was awarded a reserve state title in dressage and that was never advertised?. What ...
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:15 PM   #61
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The horse was awarded a reserve state title in dressage and that was never advertised?.
What horse? What year?? What state???
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:17 PM   #62
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buckley, '08, wa assoc champs (reserve elem)
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:33 PM   #63
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I like Stbs. Always have. Every one i've ever dealt with has been a nice horse. When i was looking for my first horse, i looked at Stbs.

But the problem why they are disliked i think comes from a few reason.

1) You cannot find a re-trained Stb for sale.
2) Most people don't have the experience and knowledge to re-train one themselves. They end up with problems, horse sold, person says 'never again'.
3) The people that do and can re-train them know it's not worth it, because no one will pay the same money for a re-trained Stb as they will for a untrained 'has potential' TB. So there is no incentive for people to re-train them.
4) There really isn't any media to promote Stbs that are doing well.
5) They are seen only to be good for bush rides or endurance or for beginners. For beginners they are not, since they all have to be re-trained. For bush rides, they can't canter, and they pace everywhere. Plus, most people like to go out to a small show every now and then. And they won't be able to do that with an untrained 'bush riding only' Stb.
So they have a very limited life after racing.

I think it's very, very sad that these horses have such a bad reputation, and are seen in such a bad light. But unfortunately, i don't think much will change until people's attitudes do.
We first need to start making people aware of Stbs doing well, so they are worth more, and are seen as a worthwhile 'investment' for experienced and knowledgeable people to re-train and sell as riding and/or comp. horses.
I do agree with a lot of what you said. I did try to sell one of my re-trained ones. Took months and months to even get interest in him. He was a nice horse who won ridden horse of the year, and also finished second in his first ever prelim test with a score of 66%. The thing is once people have re-trained them, they love them aand don't sell them on. The market would have to change to warrant me trying to do it again, as it simply isn't worth my while. Even though I do enjoy doing it.

Heiffer, I think the reserve champion was in the newsletter (I could be wrong). I do agree that there should've been more on it. I doubt something like that will happen again for a very long time. But the committee and therefore newsletter is very strong on the breed show front. Most likely because this where you find the majority of standardbreds competing. Hopefully in time more will follow in yours and Buckleys footsteps and not only tackle but be successful in other disciplines.
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:36 PM   #64
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I love the breed to bits, but unfortunately most stbs do not have the conformation to do well under saddle. Their backs tend to be very long and this makes it so difficult to achieve the collection and hind leg activity that is required for a good ridden horse. They are also trained to go very straight, making lateral flexion very difficult. I'm not saying that it cant be done (there are plenty of examples in this thread), but why would somebody put years of work into a horse that, at the end of the day, will be lucky to sell for $2000?

I would love to get a quality stb and compete and prove that it can be done, but it costs the same to feed, shoe, vet etc a stb as a purpose bred horse so why would I make it harder for myself to get results and try it with a horse that is behind the 8 ball before I even begin?

I watched the ridden classes at last year's royal and I was absolutely horrified. The education of these horses seemed to be non existant with 100% popping through the inside shoulder, terribly unbalanced with hind legs trailing out behind them, and generally awful. If this is the standard that the stb group is trying to present to the general public to increase the profile of these horses then it is certainly going down the wrong track!! Who cares if they can be led around a ring? Peformance needs to be addressed before these horses can get a decent reputation as quality riding horses. Unfortunately, anybody who has the knowledge and experience to train these horses moves on to other breeds very quickly!!
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:43 PM   #65
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So very true bec1404. I didn't attend the last royal but was told about the disappointing level of training of some of the horses. This also happened a few years ago.

I have re-trained three which I competed on extensively. They are on the website. Except my first royal. By the time I took my horses to the royal they were educated and went like educated horses. Unfortunately a lot of the more experienced horses have been retired and a new lot of horses are coming through the ranks. Hopefully the coming royal will be a lot better.
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:49 PM   #66
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mmm hopefully kp, the whole thing left a bad taste in my mouth and im kind of releaved to be away from it all!

I agree re: once you have re-trained them you love them too much, there is no way i can sell Buckley. Especially as the usual candidates for buying a stbred i would not let touch my beautiful boy.

Bec you are dead right re: conformation. It does make it harder (not impossible but harder). It also makes you learn alot (if you are prepared to put the time/effort/money in to doing it properly) and i am 100% sure my riding is much better having schooled a stbred. He taught me about improving paces, getting more out of the horse and he is not a horse you can be lazy on - have to keep riding every stride (i dont mean an aid every stride, i mean body control) to keep the canter 3-beat and with jump, get the quarters engaged, lighten the forehand, maintain good rythem etc. It is so strange for me riding my new boy who does these things naturally, even in the paddock.

I have absolutely no regrets having a stbred. He taught me SO much! And gave me the confidence to get out competing. Plus i clicked with him more than any other horse i ahve had (and god i hope i can get that with the new horse).

unfortunately for the stbred group there has been a great drop in top horses, with deaths and retirement (either of horse or rider from that sport). I hope that some new people can come through and take the place of glinding moments and the like. But also expand on the accomplishments of the stbreds who have been before them, and move into the dressage, jumping, eventing etc side of things so they are no longer seen as a horse suitable for bush rides or breed showing only.
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:56 PM   #67
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unfortunately for the stbred group there has been a great drop in top horses, with deaths and retirement (either of horse or rider from that sport). I hope that some new people can come through and take the place of glinding moments and the like. But also expand on the accomplishments of the stbreds who have been before them, and move into the dressage, jumping, eventing etc side of things so they are no longer seen as a horse suitable for bush rides or breed showing only.
I really hope so. Unfortunately you just see the same people with stbs at the breed shows everytime - there doesn't seem to be much "new blood" coming through with suitable experience to lift the competition to a higher level and to try the more demanding disciplines.
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:59 PM   #68
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i do feel sorry for the standardbred, their amazing temperament is what lets them down.
most people who get standies are not the greatest of TRAINERS, (see i said trainers not riders)
without the knowledge and skill needed to train, you can not be expected to train them out of something they have been trained/breed to do (pace)
it is not simply "stop pacing" it is a whole another way of going for the horse.
not everyone has the experience or the expertise to change this.
now there also some other factors that come into this (conformation wise) on what conformation would make it easier for the standy to do dressage movements easier (shorter backs, narrower behind blah blah blah) but the bottom line is, a horse is only as good as its trainer (notice i said trainer not rider)
you can be a really nice rider, and could train a pig to shyte
you can be a really good trainer, and look really untidy as a rider
you can be both.
everyone is different, everyone has limits, everyone has a certain amount of talent, just like the standardbred.
but the bottom line is, the horse can only go as good as it is trained.

ps. thanks samm
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Old 08-04-2010, 01:02 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by Heifer View Post
buckley, '08, wa assoc champs (reserve elem)
oh- thought you meant real dressage sorry...
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Old 08-04-2010, 01:05 PM   #70
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I know absolutely nothing about STBs, in my life I believe I have ridden one once -that I can remember.

However, I am interested in the above comment. If the horse is stunning and awesome to ride, then why do they sink in official competition? If its not conformation or behaviour, it must be movement right? and I have seen some pretty average moving horses of all breeds do relatively well in official competition?????
I used to own some stunning Stb's, it wasn't a personal attack as such and still do own 1 (he went Reserve Champ Gelding at the Stb HOTY in November so not a bad 1 either) but have leased him out to do something he is good at which is help build his riders confidence and do the odd show and adult riders.

Don't get me wrong, if I saw a stunning 1 that moved well, worked well etc it would be great to see it do well in the official ring but, fact is, you would be pushing crap up hill. Its not my personal bias to the breed, I have a soft spot for them, its just how it is at least in WA.

They have come a long way, when I 1st started showing them, they wouldn't even get a look in unofficial, now many have won Champ Unofficial so maybe 1 day someone will get 1 to official level and start to break the mould and slowly more will follow, only time will tell and good luck to those who want to give it a go!

Thought I should also mention, Stbs have done very well jumping and eventing before the days of Gliding Moments etc. There used to be Amsley Ideal, Oakridge Elegance and my old boy Manhattan did well in open company hacking too. Amsley Ideal was a real ambassador of the breed doing well in dressage and eventing mainly, I was very lucky to get to have a ride and wow!
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Last edited by Lokenzo; 08-04-2010 at 01:28 PM.
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