Worming horses?

Discussion in 'Horse Management' started by Remaani, Jul 11, 2008.

  1. wormwatch

    wormwatch Active Member

    Did your vet discourage you from doing worm egg counts or discourage you from doing worm egg counts occasionally, stopping worming your horse and hoping for the best?

    Worm egg counts can't ever replace the need for effective treatments and pasture management. You should look at worm egg counts as an additional tool rather than a replacement for good pasture managment and worming treatments. The key is to use worm egg counts for monitoring the success of your existing programme and identify the need to make any changes as required. Worm egg counts are also the best way to identify worm resistance developing to treatments.

    If you are doing no monitoring, how can you be sure that the existing system is working effectively to keep worm burdens under control? Many Worm Watch clients are surprised to find worm burdens are present in their horses - had they not monitored, they would not have known there was a problem with the current system until the burdens built up to such a level that they were seeing worm-related disease. Monitoring alerts you to problems early so that you can intervene and make the changes needed before it becomes a "big" problem and horses are sick.
     
  2. Noelle

    Noelle Gold Member

    Great replies Wormwatch :)* and much appreciated. I will have to print all this off and put it in a folder with my other horse related bits of information for later reference.

    Did your vet discourage you from doing worm egg counts or discourage you from doing worm egg counts occasionally, stopping worming your horse and hoping for the best?

    I cant remember now, it was some time ago. I asked the vet if I should do a worm count and he was pretty non commital and basically I got the impression it wasnt worth doing. Maybe I should have pursued the question further. I will be pming you re the newsletter.

    Just another question if I may, in regard to botts. A few years ago when they were agisted in a big paddock for a spell, I noticed they had bott eggs on their legs. These were removed with a bott knife and treated with a wormer that targets botts. In all the time they have been on our home property (before the spell and after) I have never seen bott eggs on their legs. If I dont see the bott eggs on a horse could it be that they wouldnt have botts?

    Thanks and much appreciated :))
     
  3. wormwatch

    wormwatch Active Member

    These is no real way of knowing 100% that a horse is bot free as there is no special test for bots that live in the stomach. Luckily many worming treatments are effective against bots and so these can be included in your annual control program/rotation. If you were going to use a treatment that covered bots, winter is a good time to include that treatment, although there may be individual circumstances that would cause your vet to advise you differently. You should speak to your vet as they know your situation and your horse.
     

Share This Page