taffy?

Discussion in 'Colour Questions' started by jlnew, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. jlnew

    jlnew Well-known Member

    my daughter is going to look at a taffy pony on sunday, and in th 2 pics we have seen of him he appears to be 2 completely dif colours.

    SO

    can someone tell us more about th colour "taffy" in his show pics he looks dark dapple grey with silver mane and tail. in his paddock condition photo, he looks like a light bay with silver mane and tail.

    im guessing he was clipped and rugged for his show pic and that would explain th huge dif in colour.

    miss 10 would like to see pics of your taffy's all done up for show and in paddock condition so she can compare. IF we end up with this little man, youll prob see miss 10 out competeing with him at shows.

    :))
     
  2. jlnew

    jlnew Well-known Member

    also, someone had a link to a genetics site where you had a horse and you could turn on his colour genes and make him all dif colours, ive lost th link and the kids would like to play with it.

    ___ nevermind, found this one!
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2011
  3. Tintara

    Tintara Well-known Member

    Clipped silvers (official name for the 'taffy' dilution) often do look grey. His correct colour is probably bay silver based on your description of his unclipped coat.

    Silver or taffy is one of the 5 currently known equine coat colour dilutions. The other four are cream (palomino, buckskin, cremello, perlino), dun, champagne and pearl. Coat colour dilutions are caused by genetic mutations at cellular level which affect or modify coat and skin pigment. Cream dilutes red pigment to gold or cream but leaves black pigment untouched (except when a horse carries two copies of the mutation) and silver dilutes black pigment but leaves red pigment untouched. So, a black or brown horse carrying silver will generally have a silver to cream mane & tail and a brownish hue to their coat; some black silvers though remain almost black with only their manes and tails being diluted. Black & brown silvers often also have dapples hence the term silver dapple. A bay horse carrying silver on the other hand usually only has their black points diluted because their coats carry a lot of red pigment which is unaffected by the dilution. These horses can resemble chestnuts which has led to a lot of them being incorrectly registered / called chestnuts.

    Hope this helps.:)
     
  4. jlnew

    jlnew Well-known Member

    it helps enormously! Mali was very puzzled by his totally diferent coour when clipped, but is fasinated by his "diference" to most of th horses she has seen.
     
  5. Remaani

    Remaani Guest

    Here's some pics of the Silver's (Taffy) i've owned/still own, different times of the year or not clipped/clipped.

    Laddie, November, clipped about a week beforehand.

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    January, growing out the clip.

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    About 2 wk old clip late March.

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    In winter coat - blah! LOL.

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    All the above pics whilst Lad was in WA, the below pic was November 2010 (he left WA Oct 2009). Unsure if clipped or under lights but coat looks awesome - plus hasn't he matured!

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Remaani

    Remaani Guest

    Silver (Jo, your daughter would of loved this boy, he was truly one of a kind. I sent him out on lease as a colt, he was gone 2 wks & was traumatised badly, enough for him to retaliate back & would attempt to "go" those wearing baseball caps, brought him home & within 24 hrs he was back to his honest, kind self, i ended up gelded him that week & he has gone on to be the most fantastic friend for someone i know - even after the most worst 2 wks of his life :-( - he was such a forgiving pony).

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  7. Remaani

    Remaani Guest

    This is Smokey, pics when i owned him.

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    This pic is cute, Smokey is in the foreground & the other Silver was one of SY members, Stormridge's.

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    Smokey in his new home not long after he was sold.

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    His sire:

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    His dam (no Silver):

    [​IMG]
     
  8. ArabAtHeart

    ArabAtHeart Well-known Member

    Tintara, isn't Agouti also a dilution?
     
  9. jlnew

    jlnew Well-known Member

    lovly little things remaani! isnt th colour changes throughout th yr and clipped/unclipped so interesting?

    mali has already decided that th pony about to be viewed (tomoro) is hers, lol, so i hope he works out! im trying to convince her to be a little sceptical, but its not working!
     
  10. Tintara

    Tintara Well-known Member

    Agouti is the factor that controls the distribution of black pigment in the coat rather than a dilution per se. A true black horse is negative for agouti (aa) which means they have black pigment distributed evenly right across their body. A horse that carries agouti (one aA or two AA copies) will have black pigment removed from their soft spots (brown) or whole torso (bay) in varying degrees. There is a lot of evidence now to support the theory that there are two types of agouti - 'brown' agouti and 'bay' agouti.

    A dilution on the other hand dilutes coat and skin pigment ie waters it down if you like - turns red into gold or black into silver. It doesn't control or affect the actual distribution of the pigment in the coat and skin.

    Does this make sense?
     
  11. jlnew

    jlnew Well-known Member

    does to me tintara :))
     
  12. nazza

    nazza New Member

    :D Hey jlnew....has the results from your colour tests come back yet...I was reading through your thread...as you have me think about my mare's colour now..lolzzz....its facinatingly confusing!!!!**)
     
  13. jlnew

    jlnew Well-known Member

    in the end i didnt need to get him colour tested, those that know these things told me that he is a silver bay, no if's but's or maybe's. lol.

    i know own 3 dilute boys, this one (silver bay) a patchy silver bay, and a dun palouse colt.
     

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