Payment Plans

Discussion in 'Breeding Horses' started by dopeyqh, Oct 5, 2013.

  1. dopeyqh

    dopeyqh Active Member

    Can any breeders or knowledgeable people please enlighten me on the concept of a payment plan?

    Who can get them, and why are they used?

    How does it work, do you pay off the horse gradually? And does the horse stay on the breeders property until it's paid off?

    If anyone has any stories please share :) xxx
     
  2. South Boulder Boy

    South Boulder Boy Well-known Member

    The idea is if you can't buy the horse outright you pay it off instead. I find it a really good choice because a large lump sum payment can be hard to come up with or hard on the pocket where's mulitple smaller sums are easier. I DON'T agree with the whole 'if you cant afford the horse you can't afford to keep it'. I think it would be the same as saying if you can't afford the house you can't afford the bills, if you can't afford the car you can't afford the fuel/insurance. That's ridiculous in my opinion and there's a reason these things come with loans. There's a huge difference between $10,000 now and $200 a week (or smaller amounts too).

    We (and the breeders we deal with) offer them to anyone we know we can trust, people with good credit history's and/or people with solid references.

    We work it out on an agreement and the horse says with us (or breeder) until fully paid. You pay x amount each week or month until paid off and then you get the horse. It's done this way because too many people don't pay up and this way you can take as long as you want but you don't get the horse til paid up. Depending on who it is the agreement can be just verbal or a contract is signed.

    One of the larger studs used to be take the horse straight away but keep paying it off but again to many non payers. Interestingly I know one guy who came into trouble and couldn't finish paying a stud fee off and he ended selling his mare to the stud instead to cover the outstanding debts (long story, he had already had 3 horses from this stud using his mare, 4th foal had problems that bought in huge vet bills, foal died coupled with a change of jobs etc).
     
  3. Designer Gene Program:)

    We offer payment plans in a way of our DGP:), when buyers not only have the opportunity to pay their horses off but create them as well using our rare genetics and hard work, while sitting and waiting for their chosen baby to arrive in their drive way!
    Check it out on COLIBAN QUARTER HORSES
     
  4. wawa85

    wawa85 Guest

    When I originally sold Misty I sold her on a payment plan. The owners paid about a third of the total amount for a deposit and then paid the rest off over a year. We had a written contract and they couldn't register her in their name until the final amount was paid, likewise when I bought her back we did the same.
     
  5. HexTerminator

    HexTerminator New Member

    i have been very burned by buying on payment plan and I also have had great sucess as well.
    the burn was the horse was totally not what i was told its legs where totally BEEPed. I had to fight tooth and nail and threatened to get my money back and also bad mouthed all over the place:mad:

    number 2 well that was my current horse pippa. I have a very non horsey hubby so 5k for a horse is no way but only so much a week he was happy (der still adds up LOL) I actually had a different horse picked but fate had it she got sick and lost the foal and I had a choice so I picked Pippa and its been the best choice I have made.
    I think you need to really know it can be great and it can go to crap really fast. I would sugest you look really hard into it before doing so.
    I would recommend coliban (actually her pics suck compare to the real horse:lol:;) she does not do them justice)
     
  6. Hahaha!:lol: how do you know I don't do it on purpose?*#) Under describing a horse is better than over describing them:}. It's better people get surprised than disapointed!:)*
     
  7. dopeyqh

    dopeyqh Active Member

    Thanks HexT, and Lena of course :) I have no doubt in Coliban's wonderful horses and I would definitely be interested in the DGP later, just not right now unfortunately. I'm researching options for the future, as for me as a prospective full-time vet student, a payment plan seems a good option because my income won't allow me to spend thousands upfront. Also, I am still in mourning for my beloved boy and am refusing to even contemplate another one until I'm at ease and moved on. What a sooky-lala I am!
     
  8. We are getting a good feed back from our DGP. It gives people the opportunity to plan ahead and get their affairs sorted out stress free.:)
     
  9. pin

    pin New Member

    Actually this has got me thinking.

    Coliban, when people purchase your foals in utero, how does that work? In terms of deposits, risks, payments, agistment costs between foaling and weaning etc etc?

    I am quite keen to try and sell my future foals in utero, because I wont get attached as much that way! It might not work as well for a small breeder, without a 'name', but I would love to know more about the practicalities of it, if you could share?
     
  10. Pin,:)
    unfortunately I can't teach you how to plan or run your breeding establishment:) you have to work it out for yourself to suit your personal and your potential customers needs and requirements. All i can say that it very easy to breed but is very difficult to sell for a decent price, especially sight unseen and more so in utero. It took us many years to be able to do so.
    Good luck for future:)
     
  11. pin

    pin New Member

    Fair enough. :cool:
     
  12. Be prepared to work very hard, to be 200% dedicated to your horses, read about bloodlines, study genetics and grow a thick skin - breeding is not for faint hearted.:)))
    And get a well paid real job that can fund your breeding program, because you won't see the return from horses for few years.*#)
    You can't buy reputation, you gotta earn it and it takes time....:)
    That's the best advice from me.:)*
     

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