Is It True? Hay shortage this year?

Discussion in 'Feeding Horses' started by Babe the standy ROCKS, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. FlowerPower

    FlowerPower New Member

    Where I live there is truck after truck laden with hay, export, bales and round bales and here anyway there seems to be more than last year.

    This area is one of the most popular hay areas so I cant really see a huge shortage.
     
  2. RustyRidge Clydesdales

    RustyRidge Clydesdales Well-known Member

    And where would you be??
     
  3. Remaani

    Remaani Guest

    I go thru at least 1 to 2 oaten rolls a fortnight & pay $50 a roll (add $5 extra for delivery) & i'm the only person that buys from this farmer, hay here is roughly $80 a roll & up & i'm greedy but i have 19 horses of my own to think about & i can justify not passing on my contact.... :(
    I'm guessing (but not asked), he has a decent supply? ';'

    Would love to source some wheaten rolls though, good hay! :))
     
  4. FlowerPower

    FlowerPower New Member

    Northam :p
     
  5. Floggadog

    Floggadog Guest

    Fact is there is & will be a shortage in certain areas & that will drive the prices up everywhere.
    Todays farm weekly has prices ranging from $220 a tonne to $275 a tonne. That would make rolls $100-$120 each, keeping in mind that those prices are for large squares & they don't factor in cartage.
    It will be interesting to see what the prices do as the season wears on.
     
  6. megntig

    megntig New Member

    Keep in mind that the poor farmers have had the same costs to produce MUCH less hay. I get annoyed to hear people say that they're getting ripped off by "profiteering". I'm sure it's coming as quite a shock to a lot of hay growers just how little they're getting & sure the hay would start off a bit cheaper but when they realise how low their yield is they have no choice but to put up their prices. The guy I buy off is getting so little from his crop this year that he has none to sell, he has to keep all that he's getting for his own stock. He very kindly rang around a few of his farmer mates to see if any of them would have some spare for me & gave me some contacts but you know what he adivised me? - "don't let on you're a horsey person"!!!!! Seems like there's a lot of hard to please/difficult to deal with horsey folk out there. Yes, hay will be short this year & yes, it'll be VERY expensive but I don't think many farmers will be getting anywhere near rich.
     
  7. Siren

    Siren Well-known Member

    Sorry. But this is not the case at all. Low low crops around this area aswell. We're all going to be hurting in the coming months :eek:
     
  8. Lacey

    Lacey Well-known Member

    Flower Power - I HIGHLY doubt that there is more hay there than last year!! We are only another half hour further out than there and we are down about 1/2 or more!! We have cut 2 of our 3 lupin crops for hay as there was no point havesting it - there was not going to be the grain there as it was starting to die!!! We are hoping to get enough to feed our feedlot cows that at the start of the season we were hoping to finish on grass - if it was a normal season we would have. Last year we cut a lot extra hay and effectively or so we thought drought proofed the farm for a couple of years ... wrong almost all that hay from last year is gone, we have fed out over 400 round bales!!

    With regards to canola hay it is very high in protein if cut at the right time. There was an article about it in last weeks Farmers Weekly, though not sure how it would be for horses - would have to do some reserch on it.

    The thing that realy gets me at times is we are still being asked "so has it been a good season for you up there?" by city people. I invariably roll my eyes and say 'second driest year on record and your asking if its been a good seaon?' some people have no clue!!!

    Lacey
     
  9. rbk

    rbk Active Member

    Some areas of the south west irrigation scheme are down to 30% of the allocated irrigation supply this year - the lowest since the scheme started in 1996, so the meadow hay producers and diary farmers are going to be suffering too. I hear Collie is the place to be - 100% of irrigation allowance :)
    MInd you - still better off with 30% than most other farmers...........
     
  10. mirawee

    mirawee Gold Member

    Do you know if he has enough for another buyer? *#) Our hay crop is not looking good :( And we put in meadow as well as the oaten this year and we aren't even going to bother cutting the meadow :(
     
  11. GoGo

    GoGo Well-known Member

    I do know a lady that has lots of last seasons hay left (around 600 sm sq) I know they are right for this year with there new seasons so maybe I should ask if they are willing to sell some.
     
  12. Mater

    Mater Well-known Member

    Northam is definately going to be suffering the same as other areas. They are way down on total amount from last year, and alot of what there is will be going to export.
    My dad drives a hay truck and they weren't sure if they were going to have any business this year due to the shortages.
     
  13. Sharaway

    Sharaway Guest

    The people I refer to profiteering DONT have a shortage, in fact have said this is their best crop yet, they are absolutely profiteering.

    They are not having to charge more because they have produced less.

    They are 100% charging more to make more.
     
  14. Jonty3

    Jonty3 Guest

    Ai agree, not hay shortage were I have been this week, and that extends from Esperance to Merredin to Toodyay!
     
  15. painter

    painter Well-known Member

    Hay (and lots of grain crops) are being harvested at the moment so of course there are hay bales in paddocks wherever it has been grown throughout the state. The number of hay rolls standing in a paddock does not equate to a good supply of hay if those paddocks normally produce four or five times the amount at harvest!

    And if all those 'hay' bales were actually grain crops that have failed to develop grain, then it stands to reason that there is going to be a shortage on other grains as well.

    I'm guessing farmers wouldn't be travelling from Esperance to Capel to buy a truck load of hay at current prices if there wasn't a hay shortage.

    And as for the farmers profiteering? The cost of production is the same if they net 1000 tonnes or 10 tonnes. If they can get more at the farm gate than they would if it was a good year, it might just keep a few of them from hitting the wall financially so that they are able to continue farming next year!
     
  16. Siren

    Siren Well-known Member

    Whats wrong with profiteering? If a farmer, for whatever reason has had a bumper year. While others have not. Then good on them!!! All part of the farming game. You win some, you lose some. Got to take the money while you can.

    The frosts this year have also effected the grain quality. So alot more land will have to be cut to get the amount of seed needed for next year.

    We had seven trucks running hay last year. This year looks like two, maybe three at the most.
    The numbers just arent there. The supply just isnt going to make for the demand going into next season.
     
  17. Ali

    Ali Well-known Member

    I'm thinking of moving to SA, they have oaten bales advertised off the paddocks there from just $5 per bale!!! In my opinion many parts of South Australia have been as dry as we have had it here.
     
  18. Floggadog

    Floggadog Guest

    Ali - if you do just a little bit of research you'll find that the places in SA selling hay for that price are either on or above their average annual rainfall. In which case why wouldn't they sell hay for $5 a bale.

    If you'd like to check for yourself you can check rainfall for the year & rainfall averages at Elders weather. ;)
     
  19. We have been feeding out a ton of oaten hay weekly from the end of August here.... We ran out of our own hay and are buying it in, paying market prices.
    Animals still have to be fed.
    lena
     
  20. beau

    beau Well-known Member

    Ouch Lena thats would hurt, but as you said they have to be fed.

    Hubby just bought a truck load of export bales (25 bales to the bale) so at least I have back up again.
     

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