Equine Influenza

Discussion in 'Equine Influenza' started by Lin, Aug 27, 2007.

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  1. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    DPI support for Moonbi lockdown



    06 Sep 2007
    NSW Department of Primary Industries has recruited skilled strappers to help care for horses placed in quarantine due to an outbreak of equine influenza at the Moonbi sports ground.
    It’s just one of the steps taken to alleviate the hardship being experienced by horse owners, and to ensure that animal welfare standards are met.
    Spokesperson for NSW DPI, Brett Fifield, said the department is sensitive to the needs of people caught up in this extraordinary situation.
    He said the department has already provided:
    • extended stabling, day yards and an exercise area so that owners can ride or walk their horses
    • rubber matting in the stables to protect the horses from injury
    • bedding material and sawdust
    • feed to maintain the condition of the high performance horses
    • wheelbarrows and stable rakes
    • additional watering points and taps
    • watering trough (garbage cans) in each stable
    • disposal and composting facilities for manure and bedding
    • site security
    • computer and printer (with internet connection)
    • daily briefings to keep the “lockup” community informed and noticeboard
    • negotiated access to the kitchen, laundry and bathroom facilities on site
    • schedules itemising each owner’s requirements for his/her horse
    While their owners are free to come and to as they please, most are reluctant to leave their valuable charges. The Tamworth community has provided overwhelming support. Caravans have been delivered for displaced owners and generous donations of food and food vouchers have been received.
    Various government agencies have also chipped in, with the Department of Community Services and NSW Health making regular visits and NSW Fire Brigade providing decontamination services for people coming in and out of the site.
    Efforts to secure improved mobile coverage for the Moonbi site are proving to be a major challenge for NSW DPI and the local emergency management committee.
     
  2. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Local praises DPI efforts at Moonbi



    06 Sep 2007
    Tamworth equestrian Meg Drury is full of praise for NSW Department of Primary Industries’ efforts for horse owners caught up in the lockdown at the Moonbi sports grounds following an outbreak of equine influenza.
    She said the situation at Moonbi is not ideal, but things could be a lot worse.
    “NSW DPI has looked after us – they have attended to all of our needs exceptionally well,” Ms Drury said.
    “Most of us have come to terms with the fact that we are in quarantine and are happy to do our bit to stop this disease, but we also look forward to the day we can go home.”
    She welcomed the news that strappers had been hired to help care for the horses, allowing owners to take a much-needed break.
    “There’s a lot of time involved in caring for a sick horse, with extra precautions needed to stop the disease spreading and there’s medication to administer.
    “It doesn’t mean that we can hand over the responsibility for caring for our horses though.”
    While the majority of owners with horses at Moonbi sports ground are locals, 10 were from out of town.
    “It has been tough for the people who have remained on the site, but it’s equally tough for those of us who live locally,” Ms Drury commented.
    “Life goes on, even though there’s a quarantine in place, and we still have to go to work and care for our horses at the same time.
    For more information about the Moonbi horses, refer to “DPI support for Moonbi lockdown”.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline: 1800 675 888
    More information: Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries
     
  3. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Property west of Wauchope tests positive



    06 Sep 2007
    One horse on a property west of Wauchope on the NSW mid north coast has tested positive for equine influenza (EI).
    NSW deputy chief veterinary officer, Ian Roth said the property is in quarantine and a Restricted Area of 10km radius has been created around the property.
    “The owner notified his local veterinarian when the horse showed signs of influenza on Saturday morning and follow-up tests confirmed the virus,” he said.
    The horse had attended a campdrafting event held at Narrabri on August 31, and was already in quarantine based on its link to that event.
    The area within a 10km radius of the property near Bagnoo, west of Kempsey is now one of 17 Restricted Areas in NSW.
    “Maps and location information can be found on the website www.dpi.nsw.gov/equine-influenza or you can call the hotline on 1800 675 888,” he said.
    “If you are not sure whether you are in the area but would like to know, contact the hotline.”
    Mr Roth said stamping out this disease can only be achieved by isolating infected animals and implementing strong movement controls, especially close to affected properties.
    “People movements between properties should only occur if absolutely necessary and with strict hygiene as the virus can be carried on vehicles, clothes and equipment.
    “Permits for movement of horses, horse vehicles and equipment for the Restricted Areas will only be granted in exceptional circumstances.
    “In such cases people can call the Local Disease Control Centre at Menangle for movement permits on (02) 4640 6567 or (02) 4640 6572,” he said.
    For more information you can ring the hotline on 1800 675 888 or go to the website www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries
     
  4. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    NSW POLICE FORCE
    POLICE WARN EQUINE INFLUENZA RESTRICTION BREACHES WILL NOT BE TOLERATED

    Issued at 10am, Friday 7 September 2007
    NSW Police Force is warning horse owners that any breaches of the currently enforced transportation stand-still of horses will not be tolerated and will be dealt with the full force of the law.
    Horses, ponies and donkeys cannot be moved anywhere in the state and restrictions are in place for horse floats and trucks which can spread the disease via infected material.
    The restriction is in place for an indefinite period.
    NSW Police Force is providing essential assistance in enforcing the horse stand-still and will be watching out for anyone who attempts to move horses.
    Currently there are more than 200 incidents reported or identified that are being investigated by police and the Department of Primary Industries.
    Two non-compliance cases have been deemed to be serious breaches of the movement order. Several people are assisting with inquiries.
    Police have the power to stop and search motor vehicles containing horses, donkeys and mules.
    Under these powers police can direct people to return to their property of origin and keep their animals there in compliance with control orders until movement restrictions are lifted.
    Anyone who breaches the stand-still orders can face penalties of $44,000 or 12-months gaol. This is about protecting an industry and the livelihood it provides.
    Police will not tolerate ignorance or excuses when dealing with breaches of the ban.
    Any member of the public who sees horses being transported can contact their local police or Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.
    We are asking anyone who needs information about the current situation to contact the Public Help Hotline 1800 675 888, or go to the website Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries
    ****************************
    Authorised by Assistant Commissioner Steve Bradshaw, Commander – Western Region
    (Ref: gk: f:meddocs/medrels/2007/september/equinestandstillenforcement.070907)

    Copyright 2005 Australian Horse Industry Council
     
  5. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Tests clear Tweed horse property



    06 Sep 2007
    The NSW far north coast remains free of the equine influenza following negative test results this morning from a property near Tweed Heads.
    “This is good news for the far north coast but it doesn’t mean horse owners can become complacent,” NSW deputy chief veterinarian, Ian Roth, said.
    “It is still very important for horse owners across the State to observe the standstill that is in place for all horses – and to take precautions when coming in contact with horses.”
    He said for people who have to have contact with horses, personal hygiene and clean equipment were critically important as a precaution to ensure disease is not spread.
    Negative test results for equine influenza have now come back from five locations on the NSW far north coast. Samples from horses near Casino, Lismore, Grafton, Tweed Heads and Yamba returned negative for horse flu yesterday.
    “At this stage there are no other suspect properties in the area but this could change at any time,” he said.
    “We are asking anyone with horses showing signs of influenza to contact their local veterinarian and report the incident to the equine influenza hotline on 1800 675 888.”
    For more information you can ring the hotline on 1800 675 888 or go to the website NSW Department of Primary Industries.
    Key Contacts:
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline: 1800 675 888
    More information: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza
     
  6. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Phantom racing gets the green light at Warwick Farm



    06 Sep 2007
    “Phantom Racing” will get under way at Warwick Farm on Saturday with punters able to watch race broadcasts although they will not be permitted trackside, Primary Industries Minister Ian Macdonald said today.
    Approval for Phantom Races involving horses already quarantined at the track was granted by the national Consultative Committee on Emergency Animal Diseases earlier today.
    “This will see horses back on the track in NSW for the first time in two weeks,” Minister Macdonald said.
    “This is great news for punters in the State.”
    Full TAB and betting facilities will be available at Canterbury Park Racecourse.
    “While it is obviously good news that racing in some form will return to NSW on Saturday we must remain vigilant against further outbreaks and all bans on horse movements remain in place,” Mr Macdonald said.
    Minister Macdonald said there were now 17 restricted areas across NSW.
    “We now have 2405 horses infected with Equine Influenza on 172 confirmed properties across NSW,” he said.
    Minister Macdonald said the ban on horse movement remained in place across the State.
    “We still have a complete standstill in place to stop the disease from spreading,” he said.
    “People must abide by the ban on horse movements. Those that flaunt with the law face a fine of $44,000 and 12 months jail.”
    Minister Macdonald said investigations were continuing into a single deck semi-trailer with livestock on board that was pulled over by police just north of Inverell for a routine check at 11.30pm on Monday.
    “That vehicle was carrying one black gelding, as well as cattle, and was heading north towards the Queensland border on the road to Yetman,” he said.
    “I cannot stress enough that horses are not to be moved in NSW.”
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza
     
  7. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    5000 plus calls to NSW DPI horse flu hotline



    07 Sep 2007
    NSW Department of Primary Industries call centre at Orange has successfully handled more than 5000 calls since the outbreak of equine influenza (EI).
    The hotline continues to provide important information to callers across the State as part of efforts to curb the spread of EI.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza


    Horses: a major NSW livestock industry



    07 Sep 2007
    Controlling equine influenza (EI) is vital to protect the NSW horse industry from ongoing treatment costs and movement restrictions.
    Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) figures calculated the annual value to the Australian economy of the thoroughbred and harness racing sectors alone to be more than $1.4 billion in 2004-05.
    The ABS estimated that in NSW the thoroughbred racing industry employed more than 3,300 people.
    Australia has the second largest number of registered thoroughbred horses in the world - outranked only by the United States of America, according to the Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation (RIRDC).
    RIRDC figures show that in 2005-06 about 1,700 thoroughbred horses were exported from Australia, mainly to EI free New Zealand.
    There are more than 70 individual horse breed associations in Australia according the RIRDC, most associated with sectors of the industry such as recreation and equestrian.
    One of the largest, the Australian Stock Horse Society, has 9,500 members with more than 170,000 registered horses.
    The Australian Quarter Horse Association has 6,000 members with more than 139,000 horses.
    NSW deputy chief veterinary officer Ian Roth said there would be a high cost to all sectors of the horse industry if EI were to become endemic.
    “The costs of vaccination alone are estimated to be millions of dollars a year,” he said.
    “Then there would be all the additional costs associated with veterinary care and potential losses from foal mortalities.
    “Infected horses could require an extended recovery period following infection, which could delay the return of thoroughbreds and pacers to racing for months and add further to the cost.
    “If other states remain free of horse flu there could also be severe and expensive restrictions on horse movement into and out of NSW, similar to import and export quarantine requirements.
    “It is better to eradicate horse flu now - even if it takes months - than to live with the permanent economic and animal health consequences of the highly contagious disease.”
    Key Contacts:
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline: 1800 675 888
    More information: Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries
     
  8. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Pampering for Moonbi horse owners


    07 Sep 2007
    NSW Department of Primary Industries has organised a pamper day for women involved in the lockdown of horses at the Moonbi sports ground next Friday, September 14.
    They will be treated to beauty treatments, hair styling and hand massages before sitting down to a scrumptious lunch.
    Counsellors will be on hand to help people deal with emotional issues associated with their unforeseen circumstances.
    It’s an initiative to come out of the State government’s drought support program – all aimed at looking after the happiness and well-being of people in regional areas.
    NSW DPI has implemented a range of measures at Moonbi to provide some comfort for people whose lives were put on hold with the standstill came into effect, with other steps taken for the horses to ensure animal welfare standards were met.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza
     
  9. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Ban stays on horse movements - No room for complacency



    07 Sep 2007
    NSW DPI deputy chief veterinary officer Ian Roth has reminded all horse owners that the ban on horse movements remains in force.
    “There is absolutely no room for complacency,” he said.
    “The standstill is in place to help horse owners, by stopping the spread of horse flu.
    “We want to eliminate this highly contagious disease.
    “It is just so important that people don’t move horses. It is the way we will contain this disease.
    “Those who flaunt the law are letting the whole horse industry down, from pony clubbers all the way through to the racing scene.”
    People breaking the law by moving horses in NSW during the standstill risk a $44,000 fine and 12 up to months in jail.
    Daily audio news grabs recorded at equine influenza (EI) media conferences are available from the NSW Department of Primary Industries website.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza
     
  10. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Vaccinate Or Not Vaccinate That Is The Question?


    From Dr Tim Roberts BVSc MRCVS, Centennial Park Vet Practice - I realise
    everyone is trying to do the best for their horses as they face the
    challenge of Equine Influenza recently introduced into Australia.

    NSW and Queensland are bearing the brunt of this tragedy and it is
    frustrating to watch some getting on with their business in other unaffected
    areas while others are tantamount to being in the "sin bin".

    This is all a repeat of the 1986 South African outbreak where Natal kept
    racing while the rest of South Africa watched and attended "ghost meetings".

    One might ask why can't we just vaccinate the horses that are unaffected and
    just get on with it?

    Vaccination was the only approach left to us in 1986 as the virus was
    widespread and racing throughout the breeding stock in the Cape, Transvaal
    and Orange Free State decimating foals and the weak.

    Vaccination was decided upon because by the time it was diagnosed the virus
    was well disseminated across the country and rampant in the uncontrolled
    horse population in the native lands scattered throughout the country.

    Small pockets of isolated horses were vaccinated and eventually a compulsory
    nationwide vaccination policy was adapted.

    Containment was never an option in South Africa as it is in this outbreak in
    Australia.

    While the benefits of vaccination are protection if the correct vaccine is
    used, you still need the absolute minimum of four weeks to achieve a
    suitable level of protection.

    This involves shortening the recommended vaccination protocol but it does
    work.

    I personally vaccinated an isolated population of 1000 horses at the Vaal
    Racecourse on the Transvaal / Orange Free State Border at two week intervals
    and achieved protection by the time the virus arrived four weeks after the
    vaccination program was initiated.

    Isolation was odds on to fail at Randwick Racecourse as there was too much
    interaction in the Randwick and Kensington areas between people and the
    distance was a serious concern.

    Having watched this virus in action in a naive population it was unrealistic
    to even imagine Randwick could have been protected. I must say Randwick
    trainers and their staff did a remarkable job to keep it out for five days,
    I applaud them for their efforts.

    David Payne who experienced the outbreak in South Africa stopped training
    almost immediately and prepared for the inevitable when the EI confirmation
    in Centennial Park Equestrian Centre (CPEC) was announced.
    In 1986 David and I had watched this virus travelling at 6km per day across
    the Transvaal towards the Orange Free State so the stones throw from CPEC
    was a mere hop.

    The benefits of containment over vaccination far outweigh a disruption to
    racing for three months.

    If we chose vaccination or containment the time frame is the same as we
    still need to eliminate the virus from the affected horses.

    If we can contain and eradicate the virus we will be able to return to an EI
    free status.

    Free movement of horses between the states and our greatest equine trading
    partner across the Tasman will again eventually permit unrestricted
    movement. (Provided we let their apples in.)

    As containment is the policy of the Austvet Plan we are all obligated by law
    to follow this policy.

    A lot of very capable and highly experienced people devised this response
    and set the protocols of dealing with this specific disease. Like all plans
    of action everyone must pull in the same direction to achieve a successful
    outcome.

    Random vaccination of horses would complicate this containment plan and make
    it far more difficult to evaluate the status of horses and the spread of the
    virus.

    There are a number of horses in the population that are legally vaccinated,
    this can complicate the issue but as long as these horses have a recorded
    vaccination history then they can be dealt with appropriately.

    These horses will need extra testing as they can become reservoirs "much
    like roots burning underground in a bush fire" and "flare ups" could occur
    if these horses are quietly harbouring EI and are moved into naïve
    populations.

    So having a vaccination history will most likely be a disadvantage if a
    movement permit is sought in the near future.

    What we certainly do not need is people vaccinating their horses without
    approval from the Department of Primary Industries.

    It is illegal to vaccinate horses randomly, I believe large fines apply and
    it is certainly
    pointless in the face of an imminent outbreak. Worst of all it confuses the
    immunological picture which is highly irresponsible because it will cloud
    the issue when we are trying to clear affected areas of and reinstate them
    as EI free after this outbreak.

    Random vaccination in the face of an outbreak that is being contained is
    tantamount to biological sabotage anyone adopting this policy unilaterally
    should be brought to account and face the penalties that are legislated.

    If at some point we do decide to vaccinate it should be done in an orderly
    and systematic method with the correct strains of killed virus. We must all
    work together in this crisis because if we have people doing their own thing
    it will be far more expensive and take far longer to return to an EI free
    status.
     
  11. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Message to Horse owners regarding vaccination.There are calls to implement vaccination immediately. There are problems with vaccination which have been well summarised by Thoroughbred Breeders Victoria (see below). Although Animal Health Australia is trying to source supplies it is most unlikely that we can use vaccination in the face of the current spreading outbreak. Vaccination is no magic bullet. The vaccine is not very effective and it will not be here quickly enough.
    There are other considerations. Although those severely affected in NSW are calling for urgent vaccination, it will affect all horse owners in Australia. It has to be a decision made with consideration of the national position.
    If vaccination stops us from eradicating EI, any horse owner that wants to move, show or compete his horse will have to vaccinate twice a year. The cost of this will be over $200 per horse per year. The cost of this eradication scheme will be $10 per horse (once per lifetime). I'm no economist but I can see that vaccination will be much more costly than eradication. The problem with the control stategy is that it is hurting people dependent on horses. However, vaccination will still require the standstill to continue so the hurt will not go away. We are seeking emergency support from Governments such as is available in other National Emergencies.
    Thoroughbred Breeders Victoria's expert's advice is as follows:• Vaccination may reduce the ability to detect and diagnose EI by reducing clinical signs, whilst still allowing horses to be infected and spread EI
    • In vaccinated horses, blood tests will be unable to be used to determine if a horse has a current or prior infection hindering control measures
    • Vaccinated horses have been responsible for the spread of EI to several countries including Australia
    • Imported stallions in Eastern Creek which were vaccinated still became infected with this strain of EI virus
    • Europe has a vaccinated racing and sport horse population but outbreaks of EI continue
    • Mass vaccination of all JRA racehorses twice yearly did not prevent a recent epidemic in Japan
    • Care must be taken that vaccine teams do not spread disease
    • Current vaccines require 2 doses at least 4 weeks apart and then a 7 day lag phase to induce immunity
    • Adverse reactions to EI vaccination are reported and vaccine manufacturers recommend a period of rest after vaccination. This creates a problem for horses in training.
    • We don’t know what strain of EI has caused this outbreak in Australia
    • The vaccines are unlikely to include the current viral strain and unless satisfactory cross immunity can occur it may be useless
    • The only vaccine licensed for use in horses exported from Australia does not contain the current OIE recommended EI strains
    • The use of unlicensed vaccines may create legal issues in the event of adverse reactions
    • Vaccine based immunity is short lived and breakdowns have been reported as little as 4 weeks after vaccination
    • There will not be enough vaccine doses for the entire population and unless the other breeds which represent 80% of the horse population are vaccinated it may prove useless in preventing further spread of EI.
    • Many horses do not have suitable identification or passports to record vaccination
    • Vaccination of high risk or high ‘value’ horses may be necessary in a controlled program if the current outbreak spreads but needs careful consideration

    The Australian Horse Industry Council is involved in the discussion on vaccination but needs horse people to understand all the issues involved. We try to represent the interests of all horse people but in this current situation various factions and states are polarised for very obvious reasons. Vaccination is not a simple solution - we may chose to use it but it will cost us in the future.
     
  12. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Tamworth organisation warned: horse rugs and blankets included in standstill



    08 Sep 2007
    The movement of horse equipment such as saddle blankets and horse rugs is restricted in the Tamworth shire and nearby shires.
    An organisation advertising a service to pick-up and clean dirty horse rugs and saddle blankets around Tamworth has prompted NSW DPI to issues a warning that this activity is in breach of the current standstill of horses, equipment and horse products.
    This is especially the case in the Tamworth EI Restricted Area.
    Due to the equine influenza outbreak, restricted areas have been declared in the State’s north west for local government areas administered by Tamworth Gunnedah, Narrabri, Liverpool Plains, Coonamble and Moree Plains Shire Councils.
    To help control the disease, there are added regulations in Restricted Areas that govern the movement of horse equipment.
    NSW Department of Primary Industries is recommending that horse vehicles and equipment should not be moved at this time. But for essential movements there are strict guidelines that must be observed.
    Horse equipment must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected before it can be moved out of, into or within a Restricted Area. Horse equipment includes harnesses, saddle blankets, saddles, dentist and farrier tools, drenching tubes, bedding, troughs and other equipment used in connection with horses.
    Horse fodder can only be moved out of, into or within a Restricted Area if it is “new”, that is, it has not been in contact with horses or horse products. This is best ensured by sourcing the fodder from a wholesale or retail outlet where no horses are resident.
    Empty horse vehicles and floats can only be moved out of, into or within a Restricted Area if they are not contaminated with any horse products. If movement is essential, the vehicle must be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected and preferably not used to transport horses for 3 days afterwards.
    Good biosecurity by horse owners in areas near known infected properties will be one of the keys to getting on top of the State’s equine flu outbreak.
    For a permit to move any horse equipment, product or feed call 1800 675 888
    Key Contacts:
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline: 1800 675 888
    More information: Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries
     
  13. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

  14. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    $110 million Equine Influenza Assistance

    The Australian Government has announced further assistance for people and businesses facing additional costs and significant financial hardship, as a direct result of the Equine Influenza quarantine measures currently in place.


    Minister for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Peter McGauran has announced the $110 million funding package, which includes:
    Equine Workers Hardship Wage Supplement Payment: Workers involved in commercial horse dependent industries who have lost their job or most of their income, and sole-traders whose incomes have effectively ceased (transport operators, riding coaches, farriers etc), will receive the equivalent of Newstart Allowance. Applicants will be subject to income testing, but no assets or activity tests. The estimated cost of these payments is $20 million;
    Equine Influenza Business Assistance Grant: $5000 will be available for businesses which derive the majority of their income from the commercial horse industry, and have experienced a significant downturn in income. The estimated cost of these grants is $45 million;
    Commercial Horse Assistance Payment: Payments will be made to eligible primary carers whose racing, harness or professional equestrian competition horses have been unable to undertake their normal activities, and could otherwise have generated an income, if not for the quarantine restrictions in place. The estimate cost for these payments is $44 million; and
    Grants for non-government, not-for-profit equestrian organisations: Up to $200,000 will be available to equestrian organisations who have, in addition to the provision of voluntary services by their members or affiliates, incurred expenses directly related to the outbreak of Equine Influenza, and the resulting quarantine restrictions. $1 million has been allocated for these grants.
    “The assistance announced today will ease the immediate financial burden that workers, horse-dependent business owners and equestrian organisations are suffering as a result of the standstill measures still in place in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), New South Wales (NSW) and Queensland (QLD),” Mr McGauran said.
    This brings the expected total cost of the Australian Government’s assistance to
    $114 million as it comes on top of $4 million already provided to help those in need of emergency financial assistance. The final cost of the package will be determined by the length of time the quarantine and movement restrictions are in place.
    FURTHER DETAILS AND GUIDELINES

    Equine Workers Hardship Wage Supplement Payment

    The Equine Workers Hardship Wage Supplement Payment will be paid fortnightly to individuals who have lost their primary source of income, which is derived directly from the commercial horse industry, and whose income has been affected by Equine Influenza outbreak and the associated quarantine and movement restrictions.
    The payment will be the equivalent of the Newstart Allowance ($424.30 per fortnight for singles). Applicants will have to satisfy the Newstart income test, but will not be subject to any assets or activity tests.
    The Payment will be made for up to 12 weeks from the date of declaration of the Equine Influenza outbreak - 25 August 2007 in NSW and QLD. Backdating to the date of the original standstill orders will be available if applications are received within 8 weeks from the declaration date.
    Application forms and further information on the Equine Workers Hardship Wage Supplement will be available on the Centrelink website Centrelink Home Page or by calling the Equine Influenza Hotline on 1800 234 002.
    Equine Influenza Business Assistance Grant

    A business assistance grant of $5000 is available for businesses which derive the majority of their income from the commercial horse industry, have occurred additional costs to implement the quarantine measure and have experienced a significant downturn in income. The Equine Influenza Business Assistance Grant (EIBAG) will provide businesses with flexibility to identify their own financial priorities.
    Application forms and further information on the Equine Influenza Business Assistance Grant will be available on the Centrelink website Centrelink Home Page or by calling the Equine Influenza Hotline on 1800 234 002.
    Grants for non-government, not for profit equestrian organisations

    Assistance will also be available for non-government not-for-profit equestrian organisations that have incurred additional expenses during the equine influenza outbreak, resulting from assistance and services provided during quarantine restrictions.
    Grants of up to $200,000 will be available to equestrian organisations who have, in addition to the provision of voluntary services by their members or affiliates, incurred expenses directly related to the outbreak of Equine Influenza and the resulting quarantine restrictions.
    Additional information is available by calling the Equine Influenza Hotline on 1800 234 002.
    Commercial Horse Assistance Payment

    A Commercial Horse Assistance Payment (CHAP) will also be available to primary carers whose racing, harness or professional equestrian competition horses have been unable to undertake their normal activities, and could otherwise have generated an income, if not for the quarantine restrictions in place.
    This payment will make sure horses receive adequate care, and remain fit and healthy during the current quarantine restrictions, so that all horse industries can make a swift and full recovery as soon as the standstill is lifted.
    It is estimated that up to 10,000 horses in the ACT, NSW and QLD will be eligible for assistance, if as a result of quarantine restrictions, they are not able to engage in activities that could potentially earn an income.
    CHAP will be administered by the relevant racing and harness authority in each state and territory, based on stable returns. For other commercial horses, the state Equestrian Federation will administer payments.
    Payments based on a daily rate will be paid to horse carers on a fortnightly basis.
    • Daily rates are as follows:
    • NSW Metropolitan Thoroughbreds $60
    • NSW Provincial/ ACT Thoroughbreds $55
    • NSW Country Thoroughbreds $50
    • NSW Metropolitan Harness $20
    • NSW Provincial/Country Harness $15
    • QLD Metropolitan (Bris, GC) Thoroughbreds $55
    • QLD Country Thoroughbreds $50
    • QLD/ACT Harness $20
    • Other commercial non-racing horses $20
    A portion of the payment may be retained by the relevant equine authority for limited purposes which may include the payment of worker’s compensation and public liability premiums on behalf of participants.
    Application forms and further information on the Equine Influenza Commercial Horse Assistance Payments will be available from your relevant state racing, harness or equestrian organisation. Contact details are available by calling the Equine Influenza Hotline on 1800 234 002.
     
  15. Murray

    Murray Well-known Member Staff Member

    ALL Members,

    These are the forms generated by the Ag Dept in conjunction with the WA Horse Council after the Biosecurity workshop that was held on Thursday 6/9/07. Please pass them on to any association or committee who organises events or rallies or even just trail rides as it is records and information that they are trying to get everyone to keep so that if the status of EI changes in Wa we will be able to track it and hopefully keep it contained.

    admin

    General information for competitors participating at horse events

    Biosecurity procedures for WA horse events as endorsed by WA Horse Council 7 September 2007

    Record of horse and competitor details for officials at horse events

    Horse arrival without a declaration

    Horse event participation declaration
     
  16. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Don’t kid yourself, horse flu is serious

    The NSW DPI has responded to comments that equine influenza, or horse flu, poses no real threat to State’s horses and horse-related industries.

    “Horse flu can cause pregnant mares to abort and it can kill foals and elderly animals,” NSW chief veterinary officer, Bruce Christie, said today.
    “Secondary infections that can follow horse flu – such as pneumonia - can be fatal too.”
    Mr Christie said that in some cases horse flu infection was mild, however in others it was severe and long lasting.
    “The high temperature, coughing and loss of appetite could last for one week or longer.
    “In stallions, fever causes temporary infertility.
    “One horse owner said two weeks after the initial infection her animal still coughed badly after cantering only 70 metres.
    “Overseas outbreaks of the disease claimed up to 40 per cent of foals.
    “That’s almost half a whole generation of animals.
    “To suggest we are trying to eradicate a disease that would have a minimal effect on our horses is far from the truth.
    “On top of losses through mortalities, owners could face large veterinary bills, and also loss in productivity where horses are used in businesses.”
     
  17. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Horse flu kills fit racehorse | NEWS.com.au

    race horse dead from flu (respirtory failure)

    Property near Dubbo tests positive



    10 Sep 2007
    Three horses on a property north west of Dubbo have tested positive for equine influenza (EI).
    NSW deputy chief veterinary officer, Steve Dunn, said the property is in quarantine and a Restricted Area (RA) of a 10 kilometre radius has been created around the property.
    “The horses showed signs of influenza and follow-up tests confirmed the virus,” Mr Dunn said.
    The horses had attended a campdrafting event held at Narrabri on August 25, and were closely monitored based on their link to that event.
    The area within the 10 kilometre radius of the infected property is now one of 20 RAs in NSW.
    “Maps and location information can be found on the website Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries or you can call the hotline on 1800 675 888.
    “If you are not sure whether you are in the new RA and would like to know, contact the hotline.”
    Mr Dunn said stamping out EI can only be achieved by isolating infected animals and implementing strong movement controls, especially close to infected properties.
    “People movements between properties should only occur if absolutely necessary and with strict hygiene as the virus can be carried on people, clothes and equipment.”
    For more information you can ring the hotline on 1800 675 888 or go to the website Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
     
  18. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Latest NSW horse flu developments ready to download online


    09 Sep 2007
    Daily audio news grabs recorded on the latest equine influenza (EI) situation are available from the NSW Department of Primary Industries website: www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/equine-influenza.
    NSW DPI deputy chief veterinary officer, Steve Dunn, provides an update on the EI situation in NSW.
    Topics discussed today include:
    • Equine influenza can kill
    • Update on Tamworth and surrounds
    • Horse standstill continues
    • Figures across the State
    • Local RLPBs on the frontline
    • No permits for stock work
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888





    EI: Local RLPB is contact point for horse movement requests



    09 Sep 2007
    Local Rural Lands Protection Boards (RLPB) are now the first point of contact for all horse related movement requests from horse owners.
    “RLPB veterinarians or rangers will review permit requests, then forward eligible requests to the NSW DPI local disease control centre for approval,” NSW chief veterinary officer, Bruce Christie, said.
    “Each request will be reviewed on whether a permit is required, the need for the movement and a risk assessment.
    “Factors such as animal welfare, movement history, contact with other horses, proximity to quarantined premises and the selected transport route will be considered in the risk assessment.
    “The local disease control centre will still make the final decision on whether movement authorisation should be given.”
    Approved permits will contain specific information regarding the requested movement and any special conditions applied.
    The movement of horse products, equipment, fodder and vehicles are subject to the same movement restriction as horses during the current equine influenza movement standstill.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
     
  19. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    Horse standstill in NSW is working


    10 Sep 2007

    10 Sep 2007
    The ongoing horse standstill in NSW is working and has dramatically slowed the spread of equine influenza (EI) according to the NSW chief veterinary officer, Bruce Christie.
    “EI is confirmed on 401 properties but most are contained within a band that runs from Sydney and its surrounds to the Central Coast, the Hunter Valley and the north west of the State,” Mr Christie said.
    “There has been only one outlying spot outbreak in the last four days – which is excellent news.”
    Vast areas of NSW remain free from the virus including the south and south west, Northern Rivers, New England and the west.
    Isolated spot outbreaks have occurred near Wauchope, Mudgee, Berry, Walcha, Dubbo and Parkes.
    “Most newly infected properties are located within the known area, where there is a higher incidence of the disease and dense horse populations.
    “The spread has been mainly caused by horse-to-horse contact and people in contact with horses,” he said.
    NSW Department of Primary Industries advises horse owners to isolate horses on or near infected properties and, where possible, to create boundary buffers within individual properties.
    The State’s leading veterinarians are working on a plan to stop the slow creep of the virus within Restricted Areas in NSW.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries




    DPI targets source of “horse exhaust”







    10 Sep 2007
    NSW DPI has issued a warning notice against two central coast property owners who were selling “horse poo” at roadside stalls this morning.
    There is a statewide ban on the movement of horses and horse products, including manure, to prevent the spread of equine influenza.
    The properties on the Pacific Highway at Ourimbah, near Gosford, are no longer selling the manure and the owners will face prosecution if they breach the rules again.
    Manure, bedding, stable waste and any materials that are potentially contaminated with horse products must be held, buried, composted or burnt on site. A recommended option is to stockpile the material and cover it with black plastic held down at all edges to allow the material to compost.
    NSW DPI chief veterinary officer, Ian Roth, said people with horses need to observe the statewide standstill on horses and products contaminated with horse manure, hair, respiratory secretions or blood.
    NSW DPI recommends that vehicles and equipment that have been used near horses should not be moved to another premises at this time.
    However, empty horse vehicles and horse equipment can be moved without a permit if they are thoroughly cleaned and disinfected.
    Horse fodder can be moved if it has not been in contact with horses or horse products.
    People moving between horse premises such as veterinarians, farriers, grooms and other horse handlers must comply with a Control Order that specifies personal decontamination measures when moving between horse premises.
    Other people may move freely anywhere in NSW but it is strongly recommended that they undertake personal hygiene measures after contact with horses or horse premises.
    NSW Equine Influenza Hotline 1800 675 888
    More information: Equine Influenza | NSW Department of Primary Industries
     
  20. mod 6

    mod 6 Moderator

    queensland

    As of Tuesday 11 September 2007, there are 80 confirmed Infected Properties in Queensland. These are located in Warwick, Minden, Brookfield, Rosewood, Kenmore Hills, Tamborine, the Goondiwindi region, Julia Creek and Gordonvale.

    Regardless if you are in an area that has equine influenza or not, please avoid moving between farms or stables unless it is absolutely necessary and then, only when correct decontamination is employed. This will help stop the spread.
     
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