Copper Sulphate for Hooves?

Discussion in 'Horse Management' started by Pintaloosa, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. Pintaloosa

    Pintaloosa Well-known Member

    I was told by my farrier to put about 30 grams of Copper Sulphate in a 500mL spray bottle with water and spray the bottom of my horses hooves once every two days.

    I wasn't there when she explained why I had to do it, as I was returning my horse to the paddock (which was silly, she could have waited until I got back) so I was wondering if anyone else has done this before, and why they done it? Did it work for what you used it for?

    Thanks in advance for any help/advice etc.:))
     
  2. cow_chasin_horses

    cow_chasin_horses Well-known Member

    I have only ever used copper sulphate with water in a spray bottle on proud flesh as it eats away at the proud flesh .. but never heard of spraying on their hooves ... sounds scary to me just incase you get it on their skin or coronet band .. would it eat away at that ?? can you not call your farrier and ask again as too why ??
     
  3. Pintaloosa

    Pintaloosa Well-known Member

    Yeah, I'm worried about using it because of that. I've heard that it burns, so I'm really unsure on it.

    I don't have her number I'm afraid. I take my horse up the road to another persons place (along with a few other girls in the area) to get him trimmed, and they call her when they need her. I'll ring them tonight though and get her number off them. She did tell them why I had to use it, but they didn't listen because it wasn't for their horses ';'
     
  4. Eoroe

    Eoroe Gold Member

    I really dont think its going to cause any problems :)

    It will kill the bacteria and fungus. Sounds like a pretty sensible bit of advice to me **)

    The levels of salt, peroxide ect that are used in skin wahes, and bacteria killing levels would also cause irritation if left in place for a long period of time.

    Proud flesh can also be removed with Calcium Carbonate - and that isnt going to hurt anything.

    Honey also removes proud fleash - so try not to use that as a comparison :)
     
  5. Kiwigirl

    Kiwigirl Well-known Member

    Copper Sulphate can also be used to treat seedy toe and thrush, maybe your farrier noticed a bit of that or the early signs of it, so she suggested using the CuSO4 to nip it in the butt early :D';'
     
  6. El_equine

    El_equine Well-known Member

    I used it when my horse had thrush, it kills the nasties **) works quickly & is cheap.
     
  7. cow_chasin_horses

    cow_chasin_horses Well-known Member

    wow didnt know that .. i might use it on my mares seedy toe then ... the farrier has cut it out so it is open and can try and dry out but maybe this will help her a bit more .. she isnt lame or anything but if it prevents any bad buggys getting into her seedy toe then it is worth a try ...
     
  8. madison

    madison Well-known Member

    I used it to treat my mares seedy toe as well, worked a treat
     
  9. Claireb

    Claireb Well-known Member

    Co Su

    Hi

    Yes its used for hoof related infections.

    I have never used it as I prefer to use collidial silver as it doesn't affect healthy tissue.

    You just need to find out what problem your horse has, seedy toe, white line disease, thrush etc

    Infections are caused by several things, unhealthy feet, unbalanced feet, wet paddocks, poor stable hygiene etc

    Bugs need wet and warm conditions to cause a problem so middle of summer and cold winters are not a problem but spring/autumn can be problematic.

    The better draining/dryer environment the better.

    Claireb
     
  10. Floggadog

    Floggadog Guest

    I tired copper sulphate on seedy toe last year with little success, rang a local farrier who told me to use Miltons on her hooves. Can't even remember if it was diluted. Seemed severe to me but it did work.
    Claire is colloidal silver used in the same way?
    Sprayed into the cracks twice daily?
    Sounds much better than Miltons.
     
  11. Sophiesumacoz

    Sophiesumacoz New Member

    Yep, I was told to use it for Seedy Toe too, I just sprayed it into the cracks regularly.
     
  12. Claireb

    Claireb Well-known Member

    Silver

    Yes it is. However, I usually recomend daily if possible.

    By Milton I am assming the baby sterlising stuff. This works fine on mild infections.

    Cx
     
  13. Floggadog

    Floggadog Guest

    Yes the baby stuff.
    So are you saying colloidal silver is more effective for bad infections? how do you apply? Straight or diluted?
     
  14. Pintaloosa

    Pintaloosa Well-known Member

    Oh awesome :D Thank you so much everyone. I'm glad to hear others have used it before without anything bad happening x)

    I saw another one of the girls I get my horses feet trimmed with yesterday and they remembered that the farrier said that he had a bit of thrush starting. So at least I know the reason for using it now!

    Thank you again everyone. This was very helpful :)
     
  15. Claireb

    Claireb Well-known Member

    Ok heres the procedure:

    Collodial silver will usually come made up as a spray. Milton and Copper Sulphate will need dilution.

    For seedy toe

    Pick out as much dirt as possible, you can use something like a nail to pick it out. Then spray or use a syringe to put the solution into the gap. The infection doesn't like oxygen so do not pack it with anything.

    For thrush (sole)

    Clean the underside of the foot first, use a wire brush to remove dirt. Clean with cold water.

    Dab with a towel/kitchen towel then spray the underside of the foot.

    For Frog infection (thrush

    Clean as above, remove any material from the co lateral grooves (either side of the frog. remove dirt from the central sulcus (the bit in the middle).

    I would spray the frog then pat dry and put something like sudocream into the central sulcus if it is deep (when healthy it looks like a thumb print).

    I would do this 2-3 times per week depending on the level of infection. For horses with severe infections, exhibiting lameness, reactive to a hoof pick then there are other products that are more effective.


    Hope that helps
     

Share This Page