Cathedral Bits

Discussion in 'Training Horses' started by The Old Grey Mare, Apr 16, 2003.

  1. The Old Grey Mare

    The Old Grey Mare Active Member

    could someone let me know what a cathedral bit is?
    see story below.

    I needed a riding horse for over the winter break, so have borrowed a friends horse. the mare has been really well trained in western type riding & has been doing well considering she has been in the paddock band for the last 7 years. she has been well looked after, hard feeds, teeth done, wormed but unfit so i have started her very slowly & as she gains muscles, will try to do more with her.
    the only problem i forsee is that i have been told she used to be ridden in a "cathedral" bit, i don't know what this is but sounds bad. i have put her into a nice plain snaffle & at the moment she is taking it OK. she gets a little nervous, is expecting to be told off, so i am taking her for lots of walks & only very little jogging. loping on the lunge only (not because she is uncontrollable, but it seems to make her very upset when ridden).
     
  2. sil

    sil Gold Member

    This is a cathedral bit:

    [​IMG]

    I suggest from looking at it, that this bit is designed for some very, very light contact work. That may explain the nervousness.

    ~ Do as much as it takes, do as little as it takes. ~
     
  3. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    oh my goodness. no wonder its called a cathedral.... its nearly as big as one. are they even legal to be bought???

    -bec-
     
  4. Denny

    Denny Well-known Member

    OMG That looks like some kind of tourture weapon!!!

    I won't show that to my GG's cause I don't want them to have nightmares!!
     
  5. Denny

    Denny Well-known Member

    PS it would certainly back the strongest of horses off the bridle. LOL
     
  6. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    I dont want to sound like im a bit behind the 8 ball or nething, but how do you physically put a bit in like that?

    -bec-
     
  7. Denny

    Denny Well-known Member

    ????? With great difficulty?????
     
  8. widgelli

    widgelli Well-known Member

    I cannot believe that anyone who knows about horses and the educating of would deliberately use one of those things.
    Any wonder the little mare is so nervous about being ridden. That monstrosity would make even the most docile horse into a nervous wreck.
    As you all know , I have a bit of a thing about jointed snaffles and the way they hit the barrs in the top of the horses mouth. Could you imagine that pain that this bit would create when used.
    Think of the pressure that a long shank curb bit can put on the horse , and magnify this a dozen times , and I would think that this is what the horse would feel.
    Personally I do believe that they may be illegal in N.S.W., but cant speak for WA.
    Anyway , they certainly should be.
    Well peoples , I will now step off my soapbox , but was really upset when I read about this bit. I have seen them before ,but they have a different name over here , and did not put two and two together till I saw the picture.

    Jo
     
  9. sil

    sil Gold Member

    I have to say we ride the Saddlebreds in long shank curb bits but that is more to cater to the way they set their head and neck under saddle - like any proper use of curb its there not to be used.

    ~ Do as much as it takes, do as little as it takes. ~
     
  10. widgelli

    widgelli Well-known Member

    The curbs are not as bad as the Cathederal bits though Sil.
    Also , you would have the experience to use one . The curb does not have that huge lump of iron pushing up into the barrs on the top of the horses mouth either.

    Jo
     
  11. sil

    sil Gold Member

    The port on an english curb bit has the same action as the port on a western bit (including the cathedral bit) : When it is 'engaged' it puts pressure on the roof of the horse's mouth. The horse learns when it tips its nose in, this pressure is relieved. That is the action of any english or western curb.

    The cathedral is an extreme version of a ported curb (higher port, more pressure on the roof of the horse's mouth). Like any curb it will not bother the horse while it is left alone but in the wrong hands... well you know how the story goes!

    ~ Do as much as it takes, do as little as it takes. ~
     
  12. Shiobhan

    Shiobhan Well-known Member

    That bit is very similar to what my appy x qh gelding was ridden in. I had just a plain western curb shorter shanks and no where near as much kink in the jaw part. My appy was highly trained western but without that bit he wasa ragin galloping loony. Sad to say he was, I just wanted a nice pleasure ride and I didnt like the bit I had to ride him in. So we had huge personality clash cuase I would try to ride him in a normal snaffle and he would just grab the bit and run.

    It was like he needed the curb to re-assure him it was ok etc cuase once he was back in that bit he was fine again. I had to sell him just couldnt click with him. But yes less pressure on the reins with those bits. I would be riding on the buckle and only have to think about going right or left and he would go quick before bridle kicks in. I was also frighten of using the bits cuase I know my hands are not 100% still so I could imagin hurting his jar another reason I had to sell him to western home.
     
  13. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    Most curb type bits normally lay between 0-45 deg. I nearly cry every time i see one pulled to 90 deg. i cant imagine how this could possibly sit in the horses mouth.

    -bec-
     
  14. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    Most curb type bits normally lay between 0-45 deg. I nearly cry every time i see one pulled to 90 deg. i cant imagine how this could possibly sit in the horses mouth.

    -bec-
     
  15. sil

    sil Gold Member

    Yeah beccy, I'm with you on that one!!

    ~ Do as much as it takes, do as little as it takes. ~
     
  16. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    i take a group of C's at pony club, and they are just learning about what type of bits to use and why. i think it is about time they have nightmares, so im gonna print that picture off and show them *waves picture and arms around waahaa waahaaa like the buggie monster*

    -bec-
     
  17. Denny

    Denny Well-known Member

    Don't you go giving those kids nightmares now will you Bec.... Let them know about the bit gently.... might be a shock to their system!!
     
  18. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    mwaaa haaa haaa

    "im taking over the world"

    *runs round with globe in hand* ok *turns off austin powers*

    -bec-
     
  19. Denny

    Denny Well-known Member

  20. The Old Grey Mare

    The Old Grey Mare Active Member

    sil, thanks for the picture. ouch.
    no wonder she was a little nervous. probably waiting for me to yank her mouth about. poor thing.

    i will keep her in the snaffle as long as possible, she seems to enjoy it & has calmed down, even accepted that i am a soft rider & am not asking for the same reactions. being a senior horse, in western classes she will have to be ridden in a bridle (shank?) but my friend has a soft argentine snaffle. this looks to be a soft bit & as i am a calm rider & easy with my hands should not be a problem.

    makes you wonder why people use these bits, if they took the time to properly educate the horse, no need to use more than the plainest of bits, I love the snaffle. but i suppose these habits come from rushing through the education process.
     

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