Buckskin going Black?

Discussion in 'Colour Questions' started by nimetyau, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. nimetyau

    nimetyau Well-known Member

  2. samm

    samm Gold Member

    Horse is buckskin.Doesnt matter how much they darken,its still a buckskin,often referred to as a burnt buckskin :)
     
  3. mirawee

    mirawee Gold Member

    Sheis a very sexy buckskin :D She may lighten up again, or she may stay dark :)
     
  4. genuinesqueak

    genuinesqueak Active Member

    aww she's growing up nicely :D
    How's your pally foal going?? do you have any recent pics?
     
  5. nimetyau

    nimetyau Well-known Member

  6. genuinesqueak

    genuinesqueak Active Member

    aww thanks for that, she's growing heaps too! She's going to be a stunning horse!
     
  7. Dollar

    Dollar Well-known Member

    Yep she is buckskin, and will probably change again. I've found my buckskin foals colour change a few times before they decide what shade they are going to stay at around yearling age. They can go all sorts of weird shades.
     
  8. nimetyau

    nimetyau Well-known Member

    Thanks for that. I was getting a bit worried but I am actually getting used to the darker colour and quite like it. Especially when the sun hits it and you can see the golden glow. She is still very definately different to the two black colts.
     
  9. kiraSpark

    kiraSpark Gold Member

    Hey Barb, shes a dead ringer for Effie, the sumo westler buckskin, she was born the same colour as your little filly, and she is now that really dark buckskin colour too. Definitely a bucky! :)*
     
  10. mineees

    mineees Gold Member

    can you keep us updated on your beautiful girl.i am interested to see her go through her changes.**)
     
  11. nimetyau

    nimetyau Well-known Member

    I just realised that she could be a black buckskin cause she has a double dilute parent??? Her sire and grand sire are both palominos. Is this what they mean by double dilute? Also I have the Sire's son who is a palomino (the one in my avatar) so does that mean any foals he breeds with a bay have a higher chance of being black buckskin?
     
  12. Remaani

    Remaani Guest

    Double Dilute is Cremello/Perlino..... Single Dilute is Pali, Bucky etc.

    You need 2 Single Dilutes to get a Double Dilute foal.

    Isnt she gorgeous! :)*
     
  13. kiraSpark

    kiraSpark Gold Member

    No. She doesnt have a double dilute parent, GS is a palomino, so is a single dilute. (Double dilutes are cremellos and perlinos - two copies of Cr gene)

    No. Your stallion can only pass on the chestnut gene (ee) or a Cr (dilute) gene. Hence he has a 50% chance of passing on the Cr gene. If bred to a bay, and assuming the bay is Homozygous, you only have a 50/50 chance of getting a buckskin of any degree of darkness. A black buckskin is simply the same genetically as a paler buckskin. But the "darkness" or "smuttyness" of the bay mare may determine the darkness or smuttyness of the buckskin foal. (Assuming the stallion passes the Cr gene to make the buckskin foal). As some horses are more prone to smutting than others.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2008
  14. kiraSpark

    kiraSpark Gold Member

    Yep, and even then, youve only got a 25% chance! :p :D
     
  15. Remaani

    Remaani Guest

    Lol, i know you are not guaranteed a Double Dilute from 2 Single Dilutes, just stating to get a Double Dilute, you cant use 1 Pali & 1 black, lol. Both parents must be a Single Dilute to give you that chance. ;)
     
  16. kiraSpark

    kiraSpark Gold Member

    Yep, i know you know LOL i was just giving percentages hehe i love scientific stuff **)
     
  17. Tintara

    Tintara Well-known Member

    Just a suggestion but maybe we should start referring to cremellos and perlinos as double CREAM dilutes.

    When you think about it, technically anything that carries 2 dilutions ie dun and cream, dun and silver, cream and silver etc is a double dilute.

    I know that traditionally cremellos and perlinos have been referred to as double dilutes but with all the recent advances in colour genetics and the identification of other equine 'dilutions' - dun, silver, champagne and pearl, it seems to me that continuing to refer to double cream dilutes as simply 'double dilutes' is not keeping up with science.
     

Share This Page