Always Lame

Discussion in 'Problem Horses' started by Gamby, Dec 15, 2002.

  1. Gamby

    Gamby Well-known Member

    As most of you know my mare foundered really severely last year and although ive been told she is fully recovered, im still having problems. My farrier has been doing corrective shoeing since then and has made her feet look normal again and he tells me that after each shoeing she may go lame for 2-3 days, which normally happens. But i had her feet done 2 weeks ago and everything was fine until 2 days ago when i saw her crippled in the middle of her paddock. I really doubt she could have foundered again because in the last few weeks i have dropped her feed down and its nothing to do with the shoeing because all was fine and she would have been lame 2 weeks ago.

    This is really starting to annoy me!
    Has anyone had a horse founder and then after they recover, continueally go lame? Does anyone have any suggetions of what i should do?
     
  2. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    has your horse got bar shoes on?

    most horses that have had founder, are recommended not to use shoes, as it allows the peddal bone to keep rotating downwards.

    -bec-
     
  3. valdez

    valdez Well-known Member

    My horse foundered last year this time, The vet said it was just the beginning, and there was no rotation of the pedal bone. She had to have heart bar shoes on for 6 months. (at $100 a set *two fronts* ) and she has fully recovered. BUT i was lucky i picked it up so soon and got the proper corrective shoeing and care otherwise she might not be sound for riding now. I was told by the vet under NO circumstances was she to not have shoes on because it is the lack of support for the hoof that causes rotation.
    Good luck with your mare!!!!

    Hannah
     
  4. widgelli

    widgelli Well-known Member

    Most horses that have foundered , even if the pedal bone hasn't rotated , can have problems with the sole of the foot.
    As it has dropped with the pressure which would have built up in the hoof while she was actually suffering with the founder , this could still be sore , and even may still be contacting with the ground.
    I would recommend bars on her shoes and if necessary, covers which completely cover the sole of the hoof.
    I think that I would also have the vet look at her this time , as she could also have navicular disease , which could have flared up with the extra weight that she has been carrying.

    Jo
     
  5. valdez

    valdez Well-known Member

    Hi sarah, What is happening with arnie since he foundered?? What did the vet say, was there rotation or anything? I can give you the number of the corrective shoeing farrier that i used for tina's heart bars, If the vet didnt already recommend one for him. The vet usually tell you to watch for signs of laminitis after a colic attack, it seems to be a follow on from colic for some horses, probably what happened to arnie!!!!
    I hope he gets through it ok, that horse seems to be always of sick with something.

    Hannah
     
  6. Arnie

    Arnie Gold Member

    Hannah,
    Lucky for me the vet and farrier spotted Arnie's founder very early on. So I have a chance to work him to prevent anymore happening. The vet is unable to shoe him due to his dry feet but in a few weeks when the oil hopefully worked and his weight dropped he should be able to have his usual shoes on again. It'll take a few weeks thought before I see any improvement so lets hope it works :-S...

    ~§Arnie§~
     
  7. widgelli

    widgelli Well-known Member

    Arnie , this is where some lunging would help you. If you cannot ride him at the moment , 20 mins of lunging will help to remove the excess weight that he is carrying a the moment and will also help to keep him worked a bit as well , making it easier when you come to ride him again.

    Jo
     
  8. valdez

    valdez Well-known Member

    that is very unusual for the vet to tell you to ride him straight after he foundered??? Which vet came out?? They are usually too sore to be ridden especially without the proper support (heart bar shoes) for the pedal bone. Tina actually foundered because of muscle tone not weight, remember muscle weighs more than fat. She was also on a lot of different anti-inflammatory drugs for two weeks. Tina hardly foundered, she was sore in one front foot so i took her to the vet to get looked at, he tested and both fronts were actually sore but one worse than tthe other. I was told under no circumstances to ride her untill she had been x-rayed for rotation, after the xrays showed no rotation she had to be off work for a month. And she only had slight laminitis. I think if the vet/farrier told you to ride him I would get another vet for a second opinion. even if you dont gget another vet out ring and ask for their opinion.

    Hannah

    PS: Is it just me that thinks this is strange or has anyone else been told to ride their horse with laminitis?????
     
  9. widgelli

    widgelli Well-known Member

    Valdez, I was thinking the same thing about the vet or farrier.
    I dont profess to be an authority on anything, but it did make me wonder.
    I think that I would also get another opinion.
    If Arnie has access to a fair bit of green grass , I would also be restricting his access to it , and keeping him locked up on dry feed for a while till he has lost some of the excess weight that he is carrying around.
    Some founder is caused by an allergy to the grass toxins that are found in green grass , so keeping the horse that is affected off it helps to prevent more trouble.

    Jo
     
  10. beccy

    beccy Well-known Member

    once a horse has foundered, they are more likely to get it again, even just on little things. Their feet will be very sensitive to harder ground. most horses that have founded are recemended not to be shod. If they are shod, they are ment to have special shoes. I Think his name is "Dan Hurvey" and he is a specialist at creating special shoes for horses. The heart shape bar shoes is very expenisive, but he designs all the shoes himself, so it is not that expenisive as already made ones.

    -bec-
     
  11. valdez

    valdez Well-known Member

    The already made ones are cheaper and definatly not as good as the ones the farrier makes up for each individual horses hoof. The farrier who did tinas heart bars measured each hoof seperatly and made two front shoes with her hoof measurments, each shoe slightly different, the point of heart bars is to support the pedal bone and all horses are different so i wouldnt use already made ones. Tina weres special front shoes but normal back and will do for the most part of her life.

    Hannah
     
  12. Arnie

    Arnie Gold Member

    No Arnie didn't "founder" he was at the begginning of it. As in nothing had rotated "yet" and he wasn't in any pain. My vet pointed something out that showed he was just beggining but seeing nothing serious had happened yet he was fine to ride. Arnie had no access to lushes green grass let alone any at all. His paddock is a desert heap most of it just sand. Please don't critise me for keeping him at such a place. When I moved there (in winter) its over crouded with beautiful grass. But every summer its gotten worse and worse and I've tried so hard to fine a new place for him. If I could trust me he wouldn't be there but for now its all I got. Yes I have been putting him on the lunge also due to that he had no shoes on and they seem to crack away much faster and make him lame if I do get on him. But I refuse to bolt him around. Lunging is for his education so everytime I put him on he learns something new. His weight has started to drop and he's coming on well. He got a major crack on his hoof today so I had to stop work imedietly and I'm going back this avo to see how the crack is and to oil his hooves some more...

    ~§Arnie§~
     
  13. widgelli

    widgelli Well-known Member

    Arnie , do you have a hoof rasp by any chance?
    If not get a file and file a groove across that top of the crack. Not too deep , but enough that it may help to stop the crack from lengthening.
    If he is in a sandy paddock, not only will the dryness cause cracking, but he can get sand cracks as well.
    I do understand the position you are in , and I have only put up the posts that I do in an effort to help you and to give you some ideas.
    I would really love to be in the position to be able to actually go out an help you both with the exercise that he is doing and also with getting him up to showing, but as I live too far away, I can only help you in the way I am.
    If I appear critical to you , I dont mean to , and please accept my apology if this is the problem
    I know how hard it can be if you dont have much support and are trying to do this virtually alone , but stick with it , and eventually things will come good I am sure.

    Jo
     
  14. Gamby

    Gamby Well-known Member

    On Monday my biggest fear was realized (i kinda new but didnt want to believe it) my mare has laminitis again. Not half as severe as the first time but still bad enough to make her noticably lame. The vet said she wasnt fat but my horse just cant carry any weight now.
    So its back to the slow evening walks and another 6 months out of the saddle. My mares happy bout that but not me!
     
  15. icebabie296

    icebabie296 New Member

    Arnie Idon't want to insult you or be mean in any way but by putting oil on your horses hooves you are doing the opposite to what you think you are. Oiling hooves stops any moisture getting in at all, it penetrates any water. What I suggest you do to soften his hooves it to dig out a hole where you feed him and fill it with water. He will stand in the water to eat and soften his hooves that way. It is much better then oil which despite what many people think does the complete opposite. You could also try hoseing his hooves for ten minutes each day, but stop putting the oil on, you are doing more damage then good.
    Like I said before I don't want to insult you or be mena in any other way and I know you are trying to help Arnie get better. Just keep trying and good luck.
     

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